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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Thanks for all the info.

    I have rings in the kits, a set would be for the cooler.

    About the injectors.
    It won’t be practical sending them out, cost wise (from Alaska).
    If I were to get a new set, must it be OEM or from local store?

    Thanks.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    153

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    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    The oil cooler doesn't really need cleaning, but those weird, green o-rings must be replaced.

    I would not try to attempt cleaning injectors yourself. You're unlikely to make a difference, and you can't replace the little screen filters, which have either deteriorated, or filled up with trapped debris. Send the injectors to this guy, he's great:

    https://hurstinjectorservice.com/

    I agree it would be best to send the injectors in to get cleaned and tested but if one doesn't have the time to send them off or the money you can replace the seals and the filters yourself. I just did this for another car I have with Bosch injectors and will do it next with the Volvo. There are kits that include the seals, filters and pintle caps. I got my kit from Motor West Performance off Ebay.
    To replace the filter you can buy an inexpensive tool or use a sheet metal screw in a vise to get the filters out and then you just tap in the new ones. In the case of the Bosch injectors I worked on I needed a #12 (7/32) sheet metal screw. I screwed the sheet metal screw into the old filter until it had a good grip and then pulled on the injector to get the old filter out. You have to give a good tug on them but they come out without too much trouble.

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	9527Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	25 Crankcase ventilation 5CYL TURBO B5244T3.jpg 
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ID:	9529
    Is #10 a Crush Washer?
    I suspected I saw something when removing the banjo bolt, but it disappeared; must have fallen into the cracks. I have new ones in the kit, but just want to make sure one is there. The service manual called it "hose clamp" - undefined.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FirstVolvo View Post
    I agree it would be best to send the injectors in to get cleaned and tested but if one doesn't have the time to send them off or the money you can replace the seals and the filters yourself. I just did this for another car I have with Bosch injectors and will do it next with the Volvo. There are kits that include the seals, filters and pintle caps. I got my kit from Motor West Performance off Ebay.
    To replace the filter you can buy an inexpensive tool or use a sheet metal screw in a vise to get the filters out and then you just tap in the new ones. In the case of the Bosch injectors I worked on I needed a #12 (7/32) sheet metal screw. I screwed the sheet metal screw into the old filter until it had a good grip and then pulled on the injector to get the old filter out. You have to give a good tug on them but they come out without too much trouble.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	removing fuel injector filter.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	90.6 KB 
ID:	9527Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fuel injector filter removed.jpg 
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ID:	9528
    Thanks.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    4,059

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	25 Crankcase ventilation 5CYL TURBO B5244T3.jpg 
Views:	13 
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ID:	9529
    Is #10 a Crush Washer?
    I suspected I saw something when removing the banjo bolt, but it disappeared; must have fallen into the cracks. I have new ones in the kit, but just want to make sure one is there. The service manual called it "hose clamp" - undefined.
    #10 is an Oetiker stainless steel clamp. A one use clamp that is crimped to clamp the hose.

    You can use end cutting pliers to crimp it, but a dedicated set of pliers is much better.

    You’ll find these all over your Volvo. I just bought an assortment of Oetiker clamps and a set of pliers from Amazon.
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (114K, Michelin AS3+, LiquiMoly 0W40)
    2005 MB SL600 (50K, Michelin AS4, Mobil 1 0W40)
    2004 V70R (six speed M66, Mobil 1 5W30)
    2002 V70-XC (275K, HPL Euro 0W30)
    2002 V70-T5 (216K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (120K, IPD downpipe, cat back and other mods)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default Camshaft Crankshaft Locking Tool Instructions

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	9530
    Hey folks. I have been searching to find instructions on how to really use this tool. I saw lots of instructions, but none show the proceedure to attach it. This is one part I don't want to mess up. If you have any link, please send my way.
    Cheers.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    #10 is an Oetiker stainless steel clamp. A one use clamp that is crimped to clamp the hose.

    You can use end cutting pliers to crimp it, but a dedicated set of pliers is much better.

    You’ll find these all over your Volvo. I just bought an assortment of Oetiker clamps and a set of pliers from Amazon.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Sorry, I was referring to "#10" (red arrow); I should have been more specific on which #10.
    Looks like it's a typo in the repair manual. That should really be #14 instead, which should be a crush-washer. When pulling out the banjo bolt, I suspected I saw something fall, or it could have be gunked up dirt. I'll look around that area so see if I can find what it might be.

    I guess the two #15 banjo bolts should each have two crush-washers.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default Need To Clean Gunked Oil Trap Return Path To Oil Sump

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Name:	Oil Trap Access 1.jpg 
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ID:	9532

    Gunked oil trap return path to the oil sump.

    I used a shop vac with a hose adapter that tightly fits the opening, sucked out a lot,
    but the passage still has some gunk inside there. Trying not to push gunk dirt into the block.

    1. Can I spray some brake cleaner to soften the gunk and blow it into the block.
    With the cleaner, it would flow down the bottom of the block to the pan I have
    underneath, since the oil pan is out.
    2. Would using the cleaner leave dirt residue inside the block?
    3. Or, what would be the better practice to clean up the path to the oil sump?

    The inlet from the cylinder head is not clogged, it's clean enough.

    Cheers.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    4,059

    Default

    All banjo bolts require a sealing washer on both sides. Use new washers (though, in a pinch, you can anneal a copper washer and re-use it). Your kit should include enough washers, and they're a standard size, easy enough to replace.

    The passage is just a passage - a path for gases to get from pan to block. Nothing fancy. Clean it out as best you can.

    I would use a combination of chemistry (brake cleaner) and elbow grease (bronze brush) to clean the passage. You've got the pan off, so, hit the passage with some brake clean (I prefer the non-chlorinated kind, so much better for your lungs, it's mostly alcohol and heptane) then use a bronze or steel rifle brush. A .30 or bigger caliber should do well.

    Spray, scrub, repeat.

    Get it good and clean so you don't have to do this again while you own the car.
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (114K, Michelin AS3+, LiquiMoly 0W40)
    2005 MB SL600 (50K, Michelin AS4, Mobil 1 0W40)
    2004 V70R (six speed M66, Mobil 1 5W30)
    2002 V70-XC (275K, HPL Euro 0W30)
    2002 V70-T5 (216K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (120K, IPD downpipe, cat back and other mods)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    All banjo bolts require a sealing washer on both sides. Use new washers (though, in a pinch, you can anneal a copper washer and re-use it). Your kit should include enough washers, and they're a standard size, easy enough to replace.

    The passage is just a passage - a path for gases to get from pan to block. Nothing fancy. Clean it out as best you can.

    I would use a combination of chemistry (brake cleaner) and elbow grease (bronze brush) to clean the passage. You've got the pan off, so, hit the passage with some brake clean (I prefer the non-chlorinated kind, so much better for your lungs, it's mostly alcohol and heptane) then use a bronze or steel rifle brush. A .30 or bigger caliber should do well.

    Spray, scrub, repeat.

    Get it good and clean so you don't have to do this again while you own the car.
    Awesome info.
    The kit has four sealing washers. I used two for the breather line on the side of the block and the other two would be for the other banjo bolt.

    Will head out to get me a better sized steel brush. Non-chlorinated cleaner always.

    Thanks, and well appreciated.

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