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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default Massive Oil Leak

    Oil drain plug is dry and the oil filter cup is tight.
    Last edited by Oka; 08-20-2021 at 12:06 AM.
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/164k Miles (Maroon)
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/151k Miles (Brown)
    2005 Volvo XC90/AWD/V8/Auto 111K Miles (Black)
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 124K Miles(Green)
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles (Parked since 2011)
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles (Parked since 2008)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD (Parked since 2017)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default Massive Oil Leak

    Attachment 9509
    Oil drain plug is dry and the oil filter cup is tight.
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/164k Miles (Maroon)
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/151k Miles (Brown)
    2005 Volvo XC90/AWD/V8/Auto 111K Miles (Black)
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 124K Miles(Green)
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles (Parked since 2011)
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles (Parked since 2008)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD (Parked since 2017)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    559

    Default

    Has the PCV been serviced and replaced? A clogged PCV system can build up pressure in the engine crankcase and blow out one or both of the seals on your camshafts, allowing oil to spill out. When it happened to me, I had lots of oil covering the bottom underside of the car on the passenger side.
    2007 XC70, 206,000 miles
    2002 V70XC, 130,000 miles, parts car

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    4,031

    Default

    Thatís what a cam seal failure looks like.

    Even if you did the PCV parts, if you didnít get the block to pan passage clean, this will happen.

    Youíre going to need a new timing belt and hardware as well as new seals for the cam.

    Highly recommend a cam locking tool, and doing the crank seal at the same time.
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (114K, Michelin AS3+, LiquiMoly 0W40)
    2005 MB SL600 (50K, Michelin AS4, Mobil 1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (275K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (216K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (120K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xfingers View Post
    Has the PCV been serviced and replaced? A clogged PCV system can build up pressure in the engine crankcase and blow out one or both of the seals on your camshafts, allowing oil to spill out. When it happened to me, I had lots of oil covering the bottom underside of the car on the passenger side.
    Owned it for over four years now and doubt if the previous owner did work on the PVC.
    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    That’s what a cam seal failure looks like.

    Even if you did the PCV parts, if you didn’t get the block to pan passage clean, this will happen.

    You’re going to need a new timing belt and hardware as well as new seals for the cam.

    Highly recommend a cam locking tool, and doing the crank seal at the same time.
    Ok, thanks for the info.
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/164k Miles (Maroon)
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/151k Miles (Brown)
    2005 Volvo XC90/AWD/V8/Auto 111K Miles (Black)
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 124K Miles(Green)
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles (Parked since 2011)
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles (Parked since 2008)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD (Parked since 2017)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default

    Just curious. Would anyone recommend the right kit to do this job?

    Also, isn't there a way to clean/flush the inside of the engine?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    4,031

    Default

    The kit for the PCV is available from IPD. Get one for your model year. Get all new parts, don't cheap out.

    My recommendation, if you've had the cam seal blowout, is to drop the oil pan in addition to doing the PCV and use a bronze rifle brush to clean out that block - pan passage very well. It's likely plugged up. Dropping the pan is a couple of hours. No chemical will clean it. It's hardened carbon in the passage. You must clean it mechanically - by brush.

    You must use Anaerobic sealant on the pan and I would do the o-rings and oil cooler seals since you have the pan off. Again, there are kits. DO NOT USE RTV to seal the pan. Wrong stuff and it will leak.

    You will need a cam locking tool. I bought one by ABN for about $75 on Amazon. It shows out of stock for now. Similar type tools exist.

    You will need cam seals, be certain that you get the right parts. VVT hubs have different seals than non-VVT. On the XC, there was a VVT on the exhaust but not on the intake. FCP and IPD have seals. I would do the crank seal and oil pump seal. Easily done with the timing belt off. Parts are fairly cheap. A few dollars for each seal.

    You must replace the timing belt. Oil soaked belts will fail. If I am doing the timing belt, I would renew all the parts; idler, tensioner and belt. Then it's good for another 90,000 miles/10 years.

    One more thought - if you have over 100,000 miles on the water pump, do it now. It's driven by the timing belt. A new Aisin pump is about $80 and adds less than an hour to the job. It takes about 5 hours to do a water pump if you have to remove the timing belt. The pumps last a long time but not forever.

    I know that this is getting extensive, but you want to do this job right. Your winters are cold and your roads are lonely. Fix it right and you won't have any problems. I have 100,000 miles on the XC since I did this same repair - timing belt, parts, crank and cam seals, oil pan. A PITA, but it's fixed right. The engine on the XC is tight, dry and reliable. It uses a bit of oil these days, at 270,000+ miles, but that oil is handled via the PCV system which is working just fine. I just did the timing belt, for the third time, in January as the car approached 270,000 miles. The last time I did the timing belt was when I had the oil leak several years ago. I did everything I listed above, though not all at once, and I regret not doing the water pump when the oil leak happened because I had to pull the timing belt the very next year to do the water pump.

    If you were closer, I would say, bring it by my shop and we could knock all this out in a weekend, easy.
    Last edited by Astro14; 08-21-2021 at 08:19 AM.
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (114K, Michelin AS3+, LiquiMoly 0W40)
    2005 MB SL600 (50K, Michelin AS4, Mobil 1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (275K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (216K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (120K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    That’s what a cam seal failure looks like.

    Even if you did the PCV parts, if you didn’t get the block to pan passage clean, this will happen.

    You’re going to need a new timing belt and hardware as well as new seals for the cam.

    Highly recommend a cam locking tool, and doing the crank seal at the same time.
    I sure will do all.
    Thanks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    The kit for the PCV is available from IPD. Get one for your model year. Get all new parts, don't cheap out.

    My recommendation, if you've had the cam seal blowout, is to drop the oil pan in addition to doing the PCV and use a bronze rifle brush to clean out that block - pan passage very well. It's likely plugged up. Dropping the pan is a couple of hours. No chemical will clean it. It's hardened carbon in the passage. You must clean it mechanically - by brush.

    You must use Anaerobic sealant on the pan and I would do the o-rings and oil cooler seals since you have the pan off. Again, there are kits. DO NOT USE RTV to seal the pan. Wrong stuff and it will leak.

    You will need a cam locking tool. I bought one by ABN for about $75 on Amazon. It shows out of stock for now. Similar type tools exist.

    You will need cam seals, be certain that you get the right parts. VVT hubs have different seals than non-VVT. On the XC, there was a VVT on the exhaust but not on the intake. FCP and IPD have seals. I would do the crank seal and oil pump seal. Easily done with the timing belt off. Parts are fairly cheap. A few dollars for each seal.

    You must replace the timing belt. Oil soaked belts will fail. If I am doing the timing belt, I would renew all the parts; idler, tensioner and belt. Then it's good for another 90,000 miles/10 years.

    One more thought - if you have over 100,000 miles on the water pump, do it now. It's driven by the timing belt. A new Aisin pump is about $80 and adds less than an hour to the job. It takes about 5 hours to do a water pump if you have to remove the timing belt. The pumps last a long time but not forever.

    I know that this is getting extensive, but you want to do this job right. Your winters are cold and your roads are lonely. Fix it right and you won't have any problems. I have 100,000 miles on the XC since I did this same repair - timing belt, parts, crank and cam seals, oil pan. A PITA, but it's fixed right. The engine on the XC is tight, dry and reliable. It uses a bit of oil these days, at 270,000+ miles, but that oil is handled via the PCV system which is working just fine. I just did the timing belt, for the third time, in January as the car approached 270,000 miles. The last time I did the timing belt was when I had the oil leak several years ago. I did everything I listed above, though not all at once, and I regret not doing the water pump when the oil leak happened because I had to pull the timing belt the very next year to do the water pump.

    If you were closer, I would say, bring it by my shop and we could knock all this out in a weekend, easy.
    1. PCV Breather System Kit (XC Turbo)
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/1111...lvo-IPD-124569

    2. Timing Belt & Water Pump Kit
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/9221...ous-Kit-120612

    3. Rear Camshaft Seal
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/5840...RoCoscQAvD_BwE

    4. Front Camshaft Seal for Cam With CVVT Cam Gear Actuator
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/1060...9458309-123918

    5. Front Crankshaft Seal
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/6013...6842273-101450

    6. Rear Crankshaft Seal
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/7064...9458178-112977

    7. Anaerobic Sealer Chemical Gasket
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/1143...0644517-124841

    8. Engine Oil Cooler O-Ring Seal
    https://www.ipdusa.com/products/1639...0637339-125945

    9. Oil Pan Gasket
    Doesn't the 2001 XC have an oil pan gasket?

    Cam Locking Tool
    I think AutoZone loans it.

    Oil Cleanup
    Would the under-belly wash at the car wash get rid of the oil under the car?
    I lost all the oil from the engine; the dip stick shows no oil.
    There's oil from the front to the rear of the car (underneath).

    FCP
    I have always shopped at FCP. My issue is, when I input my car, up to the sub-model, it ends up showing V70. A while back I got the wrong part due to this issue. I called them about the issue and it's still showing the same. I always have to call them to order parts. I would have to switch to IPD. ECP has the Lifetime Replacement offer.

    In what order should these jobs be done? At least #2 is a group of work.
    Cheers
    Last edited by Oka; 08-22-2021 at 12:58 AM. Reason: Added more information

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