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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    623

    Default Timing belt life- let it break!?

    My 2007 has 212k on it. Timing belt was due at 210k. The car is in pretty good shape. Decent paint, nice interior and all appropriate maintenance done but still isn't worth much. I think its worth maybe $1200..? I also have a check engine light small leak detected that I have been unable to resolve for 4 years but I have been able to work around it fir inspection so far....

    Timing belt will cost me at least $800. But something pricey could go at anytime so I don't want to put good money after bad....

    So how long past the service interval do you think the timing belt will last. I know there are no sure answers and it could go tomorrow or last 25k more miles...but if anyone has any knowledge/experience I would love to hear it.

    Thanks!
    2020 Subaru Outback XT - Pearl White Loaded-huge improvement over 2013!
    1955 Ford F-250 - 223 IL6, 4 Speed with Granny Gear, 109 HP, 4.88 Rear
    2017 Maserati Ghibli - Blu Emozione - GONE!
    2013 2013 Subaru Outback - charcoal Grey, Eyesight Collision Avoidance 110k miles
    2007 2007 XC70, Barents Blue, Charcoal Leather 215k miles
    1978 Bitchin' Chevrolet Z28 Camaro - Fuel Injected 383ci SB Dyno'd at 452HP 462FT/LBs Torque
    My build thread: http://www.nastyz28.com/forum/showthread.php?t=276139

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    At one point I looked for statistics on timing belt failures for these rubberized fiber belts. I couldn't find any.

    All I can suggest is to remove the TB cover twice a year, and inspect for micro-cracks in the belt, sideways drift of the belt, and belt chaff or oil in the bottom of the chamber. Those are the usual pre-cursors to belt failure.

    I've moved up to T6 engines (timing chains)...one less thing to worry about.
    2013 XC70 T6 Flamenco Red (hers)
    2015 XC70 T6 Seashell Metallic (his)
    past: 13 Volvos going back to '74 242 sedan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    3,877

    Default

    Every timing belt that Iíve done on schedule has looked great. If you did the whole timing set (belt, tensioner, idler) on the previous change, this car will likely run for a couple of years before it goes.

    However, the bigger concern is your water pump. Those last 170-200 thousand miles. If itís original, you might not get much longer.

    Timing belt isnít a hard job, and a whole timing belt kit is $100 from FCP Euro. $160 with a new Aisin water pump.

    Why not just DIY?
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (100K, Michelin AS3+, M1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (238K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (195K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (76K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    94

    Default

    From your tone, it sounds like you should cash out of it now and move on. If the cash value of the vehicle is most concerning to you, the worst thing you could do is drive it until it's worthless. If you feel bad about the value now, you'll really feel bad when you destroy the engine. I don't know anything about the Volvo timing belts, but I know that the timing belt on my VW TDI fails by the teeth shearing off, and inspection isn't really useful for predicting failure unless there is really something obvious. Usually, there isn't.
    Brett

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Cumbria, UK. Maine USA.
    Posts
    494

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett San Diego View Post
    From your tone, it sounds like you should cash out of it now and move on. If the cash value of the vehicle is most concerning to you, the worst thing you could do is drive it until it's worthless. If you feel bad about the value now, you'll really feel bad when you destroy the engine. I don't know anything about the Volvo timing belts, but I know that the timing belt on my VW TDI fails by the teeth shearing off, and inspection isn't really useful for predicting failure unless there is really something obvious. Usually, there isn't.
    Brett
    Volvo's can and do go the same way, the teeth shear off, and it seems to happen on a cold start up. looking at the backside of the belt will give no indication of this type of impending failure.
    Last edited by AKAMick; 05-04-2020 at 06:49 AM.
    Current Junk: Couple of worthless rusty old clapped out Volvo bricks, XC70's 02, 04 & Countless P.O.S's, Rust buckets, Junk cars,( 50W Oily cesspool Sludge) Stolen and other assorted rubbish cars, 1928 Jed Clampett Tourer, (8 hole cast iron lump, original rust and decay, 40W Straight Bacon Grease),

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    623

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    Every timing belt that I’ve done on schedule has looked great. If you did the whole timing set (belt, tensioner, idler) on the previous change, this car will likely run for a couple of years before it goes.

    However, the bigger concern is your water pump. Those last 170-200 thousand miles. If it’s original, you might not get much longer.

    Timing belt isn’t a hard job, and a whole timing belt kit is $100 from FCP Euro. $160 with a new Aisin water pump.

    Why not just DIY?
    First, great feedback everyone.

    I am intimidated by the timing belt change. I did it on my Saab 9-5 V6 and it went well and I did the PCV update on this car without too much trouble, although it did take a weak of working on after work everyday. I am not clear on locking the camshaft gears etc. but I know you need a tool. Checked out FCP Euro and the Contitech Kit is $150 with the water pump plus I need the Camshaft Gear tool. So $200 plus my time.....the you tube videos make it look it easy but they all do it with an engine not in the car...of course it is easy that way!

    I replaced the water pump, belt, Tensioner and Idler last time. So if I can reasonably safely get another 10-25k miles out of it and I don't have to rush to do it then maybe I will try it myself when I get some free time and can have the car off the road. I don't have a lift (I know you don't need one) so I have to suck it up and be prepared to roll around on the ground for the under car stuff.

    Anything else I should replace at the same time? Thermostat? Cam Seals? and does do anything else add significant complications to the job?

    In terms of cashing out now I have thought a lot about it but $1000 now, or $0 a year from now is the same thing. Every month I drive it and it doesn't break is like a free $100/month as I will probably always be able to get $800-$1000 if it is running....

    Thanks for all the feedback!
    2020 Subaru Outback XT - Pearl White Loaded-huge improvement over 2013!
    1955 Ford F-250 - 223 IL6, 4 Speed with Granny Gear, 109 HP, 4.88 Rear
    2017 Maserati Ghibli - Blu Emozione - GONE!
    2013 2013 Subaru Outback - charcoal Grey, Eyesight Collision Avoidance 110k miles
    2007 2007 XC70, Barents Blue, Charcoal Leather 215k miles
    1978 Bitchin' Chevrolet Z28 Camaro - Fuel Injected 383ci SB Dyno'd at 452HP 462FT/LBs Torque
    My build thread: http://www.nastyz28.com/forum/showthread.php?t=276139

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Cumbria, UK. Maine USA.
    Posts
    494

    Default

    A simple timing belt and H2O pump replacement does not need the cam lock tool, if you need to change the cam seals then cam gears need to be removed and cams locked from the opposite end, if they are not leaking and the PCV system is good then pass on the cam seals.
    Current Junk: Couple of worthless rusty old clapped out Volvo bricks, XC70's 02, 04 & Countless P.O.S's, Rust buckets, Junk cars,( 50W Oily cesspool Sludge) Stolen and other assorted rubbish cars, 1928 Jed Clampett Tourer, (8 hole cast iron lump, original rust and decay, 40W Straight Bacon Grease),

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    3,877

    Default

    Timing belt is simple, mechanically. Skip the seals if theyíre not leaking. Do the water pump at your mileage. Replace the whole set, including tensioner and idler.

    Some claim to be able to do this job without removing the crank pulley. Iím not sure how, unless the guard is missing underneath. Crank pulley require jacking up the car, removing the wheel, unbolting the fender liner plate (3 10mm plastic nuts) and bending back the liner for access.

    Everything else is accessible from the top.

    Two big gotchas:

    1. Very easy to be off a tooth. When youíre done, crank the engine by hand through 720 degrees and check the timing marks.

    2. Hard to get the crank pulley bolt off or back on without a holding tool. Iíve fabricated one, but the purchased one from FCP or IPD is better than my steel bar contraption.

    This one: https://www.ipdusa.com/products/1010...RoCXg8QAvD_BwE

    Youíre welcome to borrow mine, postage to send it back will be a lot less than buying one.
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (100K, Michelin AS3+, M1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (238K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (195K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (76K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    521

    Default

    FWIW, I've replaced 2 belts without removing the crank pulley. But you definitely have to take off the small belt guide which is like two small screws.

    Getting the old belt off is easy; threading the new belt back on the crank pulley is trickier. A good tip someone suggested is to practice with the old belt. Thread it on a couple of times; twist, tug and finagle it around until you figure out the right technique to get it past the little protruding bumps and onto the crank pulley. Once I found the method that works, it wasn't hard to thread the new belt onto the pulley with minimal twisting.

    This is a job I need to do in the near future.
    2007 XC70, 206,000 miles
    2002 V70XC, 130,000 miles, parts car

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Windy Manitoba
    Posts
    630

    Default

    Can confirm, not necessary to remove the crank pulley if you take off the small belt guide - but there is only one way to work the belt out and back in - I did practice with the old belt first.

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