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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Belgium
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    2,388

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    From your diagram, it looks like both are on the same side of the engine (on the driver's side).
    What does those numbers (7/172 & 7/173) mean?
    7/172: position sensor, camshaft, intake side
    7/173: sensor camshaft
    They are the designations from the MY 2001 wiring diagram's component list.
    144 GL (1974)--->244 GL (1982)--->940 GLE 2.3i (1992)--->XC70 2.5T (2004)--->XC90 T5 (2018)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    3,818

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Am planning on buying a Cam Sensor simply because I don't know what else to try to get the car started.
    All the parts I have replaced so far, would start the car and after a day or two, it won't start.
    I saw this page. https://www.yourmechanic.com/article...osition-sensor
    All the six pointers on it, are the symptoms I have had. All points to a bad Cam Sensor problems.
    I don't know what else to do.
    Slow down, you're playing "Parts Darts" now. Throwing parts at a problem, hoping one will hit bullseye.

    Gets really expensive....not to mention frustrating.

    If you're really stuck on this - see my post in your other thread - I would go for the MAF long before a cam sensor or crank sensor. I've replaced the MAF on all my P2 Volvos when they get upwards of 120,000 miles. They wear out. Cleaning does absolutely NO good. The fix for a bad MAF is a new MAF. They take like 5 minutes to change, including opening the hood.

    "All points to a bad cam sensor"
    "All points to low fuel pressure"

    You've reached a couple of "firm" conclusions on this that have yet to be true...

    MAF is common, MAF is simple, MAF is cheap.

    I would take aim at that target first...
    Current Fleet:
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    2001 V70-T5 (76K)
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    405

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    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    Slow down, you're playing "Parts Darts" now. Throwing parts at a problem, hoping one will hit bullseye.

    Gets really expensive....not to mention frustrating.

    If you're really stuck on this - see my post in your other thread - I would go for the MAF long before a cam sensor or crank sensor. I've replaced the MAF on all my P2 Volvos when they get upwards of 120,000 miles. They wear out. Cleaning does absolutely NO good. The fix for a bad MAF is a new MAF. They take like 5 minutes to change, including opening the hood.

    "All points to a bad cam sensor"
    "All points to low fuel pressure"

    You've reached a couple of "firm" conclusions on this that have yet to be true...

    MAF is common, MAF is simple, MAF is cheap.

    I would take aim at that target first...
    Hello back again.
    Got a Bosch MAF, installed it, all went well so I decided to test the car again.

    It remote started very well at 31F. At work, tried it again, it remote started well and drove very smoothly.
    AFter twelve miles, I felt the car start to hesitate again. I managed to turn back but was just two miles from home when it gave up.
    It won't start, just like previous times. I could hear it want to start but it won't. Got it towed home again.

    Please what else should I try?
    Thanks for you'all patience with me.
    Last edited by Oka; 11-18-2019 at 07:28 PM. Reason: More clarification.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,284

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Please what else should I try?
    As a shop owner/tech I did not allow anyone to "Try" stuff that might fix a car. (unless i could keep it in stock or return it) I would not allow myself to rip off people and sell them stuff they did not need, for I saw that happen with my previous employers many times. I had my employees diagnose things and ONLY replace the parts that were really needed. I believed that was the only way I could stay in business (and sleep at night) for 38 years.

    So my only advice is to diagnose the real problem and stop just replacing parts.

    If your car fails after driving for x miles (or x time) - let it run for x time and try to duplicate the problem. And keep trying to duplicate the problem until you can detect a failure (with VIDA or whatever other methods you have available). And then replace the sensor or fuel pump or muffler bearing or left hand thread rod sleeve or slippery valve pan or whatever is causing your failure!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    405

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    So my only advice is to diagnose the real problem and stop just replacing parts.
    I think I am doing my best. I have posted lots of reports from VIDA in other post regarding the same issue.
    I replaced the throttle unit. That was pricey, but after that, I am glad I did that since the car drives a whole lot better.
    The other part I have replaced are spark plugs which it needed and the MAF. Way back I was asked to replace the MAF
    since I replaced the throttle. The outside temperature sensors were not working anyway. I have checked fuel pressure at
    the rail and at the fuel filter.

    Forgot to mention, once, I got the IMMOBILIZER SEE MANUAL error while trying to start the car.

    I believe I have always scanned the car after every failure and posted my results in other posts relating to the same issue.
    Do I have to scan it again?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Oka; 11-18-2019 at 10:56 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    358

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    It sounds like you have an aftermarket remote starter setup? If so, I would disconnect that if possible, at least temporarily bypass it, and see if the problem changes.
    PDX-Vancouver, USA

    2005 XC70 140,000

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    511

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    "The outside temperature sensors were not working anyway."

    Does anyone know if this can have an effect on driveability?
    2007 XC70, 206,000 miles
    2002 V70XC, 130,000 miles, parts car

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    405

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scopeman View Post
    It sounds like you have an aftermarket remote starter setup? If so, I would disconnect that if possible, at least temporarily bypass it, and see if the problem changes.
    At the moment, starting the car is not an issue anymore. However, it won't start now since the hesitation and complete stalling won't make it start anymore. Both key and remote starter would start it when it is ready.

    When I get to start the car, it will drive for some some 12-20 miles and start hesitating, then few miles, it will stall and won't start again. The starting sounds like an air or fuel issue. When I say "fuel", not lack of it but not getting into the system 'fast' enough for the car to start; same as for air system. Sometimes, it would want to start or start then stalls.

    I don't know if the aftermarket would cause such symptoms.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,284

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xfingers View Post
    "The outside temperature sensors were not working anyway."

    Does anyone know if this can have an effect on driveability?
    Yes there are two sensors, I think the one that DOES NOT send a signal to the outside temp gauge is the one that reports to the ECU. And if it thinks it is 150 degrees outside when it is 32 - the mixture will be wrong and hard to start/run. Also the AC compressor will not run if below x degrees, and I have replace some (one of them, not both) to restore power to the compressor. (I'm pretty sure the outside air temp was correct in those cases)

    The temperature readings are easily monitored with VIDA

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,284

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    I think I am doing my best.

    I have checked fuel pressure at the rail and at the fuel filter.

    Do I have to scan it again?
    I am sympathetic, sometimes problems are difficult to diagnose.

    You should check fuel pressure after (or shortly before ) it fails - you could have a fuel pump that is not delivering enough pressure/volume after it gets hot. Many times I have taped a connected fuel pressure gauge to the windshield and driven the car (for as long as it takes to properly diagnose the car) Or a boost pressure gauge or voltmeter or what ever is needed to diagnose the car.

    Yes, you should scan the car every time you have a problem. To see what codes (if any) come back.

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