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  1. #41
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    Mar 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    . . . a simple test light.
    Could you please clarify more on this? How or with what?

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    GA
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    1,281

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    Oh that? Thought it was a more complicated tool.
    Used to have one; been depending on multi-meter.
    Will get me a new one when I step out.

    Thank you!

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
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    3,818

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    I asked so as to find where the ECM is located; just found it. I went to the parts store and most of them show a fuel pump relay does not exist for the model.

    Since afternoon, I have been collecting information of things to check on the car when I pull it into the garage to work on.
    I also plan on checking/testing the integrity of the fuel pump relay, vacuum lines and many other thing I may find in my readings.
    I have lots of reading to do; I really need to find out what's wrong with this car. Will also will be re-reading all the replies on my posts.

    Thank you!
    Not ECM.

    CEM.

    Central Electronic Module.

    Located above Driverís left ankle. Easy enough to remove. 20 minute job. Remove trim above brake pedal and press on a couple of tabs to rotate ir and release it from the retaining bracket. Lots of relays on it.

    Looks like this:
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (100K, Michelin AS3+, M1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (238K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (195K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (76K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    401

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    . . . is it possible the car is almost out of gas? Many a car has been towed in out of gas or with a lying/bad gas gauge. (has fooled many a tech and me too when we forget to check the basics!) Or - your car has a saddle gas tank - if fuel is low enough, air can get pulled in from one side and create low fuel pressure/aerated fuel.

    I would check fuel pressure and volume - try to pump fuel out into a container, making sure it's not full of air and has enough volume to run the car.
    GAUGE
    The tank has a little over a quarter tank of fuel (according to the dash). I believe the gauge works well, since the issue before the no-start problem always occurs, after the car has been driven for some miles. So, the gauge should be working.
    PUMP
    Found some methods of pumping fuel out to a container. Siphoning is out of the question. A logical method would be a (new) manual/hand held fluid pump for a one-time use, or using the tank's fuel pump method. Just found this YouTube video
    - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxyfsfIhBl4.
    - The other option is to use the car's fuel pump, which I hope is working well.
    Interesting the tank does not have a drain plug.
    Last edited by Oka; Yesterday at 03:32 PM.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    401

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    If your car fails after driving for x miles (or x time) - let it run for x time and try to duplicate the problem. And keep trying to duplicate the problem until you can detect a failure (with VIDA or whatever other methods you have available). And then replace the sensor or fuel pump or muffler bearing or left hand thread rod sleeve or slippery valve pan or whatever is causing your failure!
    Unfortunetly in my case, I can duplicate the problem alright but that would be paying to get it towed home, everytime. So, I would keep troubleshooting till I feel I find the issue. I was able to drive the car into the garage (with some stutering of course).

    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    You should check fuel pressure after (or shortly before ) it fails - you could have a fuel pump that is not delivering enough pressure/volume after it gets hot. Many times I have taped a connected fuel pressure gauge to the windshield and driven the car (for as long as it takes to properly diagnose the car) Or a boost pressure gauge or voltmeter or what ever is needed to diagnose the car.
    I can't try the gauge inside the car since I cannot drive the car long enough for such test.

    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    Yes, you should scan the car every time you have a problem. To see what codes (if any) come back.
    One question I have always wanted to ask is, when I re-scan the car, should I clear the existing scan to start with a new one or "Update" (Add) to the previous (Existing) scan?

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    Slow down, you're playing "Parts Darts" now. Throwing parts at a problem, hoping one will hit bullseye.

    Gets really expensive....not to mention frustrating.

    If you're really stuck on this - see my post in your other thread - I would go for the MAF long before a cam sensor or crank sensor. I've replaced the MAF on all my P2 Volvos when they get upwards of 120,000 miles. They wear out. Cleaning does absolutely NO good. The fix for a bad MAF is a new MAF. They take like 5 minutes to change, including opening the hood.

    "All points to a bad cam sensor"
    "All points to low fuel pressure"

    You've reached a couple of "firm" conclusions on this that have yet to be true...

    MAF is common, MAF is simple, MAF is cheap.

    I would take aim at that target first...
    I have only replaced the obvious parts so far:
    - Throttle unit (XeMODeX) - (Glad I replaced this. The car drives better and quicker)
    - Outside Temperature Sensors (which fixed my non functioning dash temperature non-reading
    - Spart Plugs (Pre gapped)
    - MAF (Bosch)

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    Fuel trim maxed out. O2 sensor out of range. Stinky exhaust. Doesnít start or run right.

    I think youíve got a vacuum leak.

    Cracked or mispositioned pipe or coupling between the MAF and the ETM.

    Is it possible that the pipe to the ETM was damaged when that was replaced?

    Thatís where I would start.

    A fine tooth comb. Flashlight. Mirror...

    Hereís the intake pipe on my daughterís BMW X3. Looked fine until I took it off. Ran poorly, though.

    Attachment 9162
    I will have to remove the hose to the ETM to check it again. It was a pain to take out or in, but I need to check to eliminate that there is not hose breakage.
    Before I installed it to the new ETM, I checked the hose. But need to really check very carefully when doing a vacuum leat check on all the other hoses.

    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    Vida should have suggestions as to what to look at if you click on that code or look it up under information/fault tracing I think.

    Your audio recording - if you are sure you got the air intake hoses all back on correctly - is it possible the car is almost out of gas? Many a car has been towed in out of gas or with a lying/bad gas gauge. (has fooled many a tech and me too when we forget to check the basics!) Or - your car has a saddle gas tank - if fuel is low enough, air can get pulled in from one side and create low fuel pressure/aerated fuel.

    I would check fuel pressure and volume - try to pump fuel out into a container, making sure it's not full of air and has enough volume to run the car.
    I will go back to VIDA to look for suggestions.
    The car has a little over a quarter tank of fuel.

    One more thing. I have already took the time to re-read the posts, made lots of notes and already started gathering information and working on the trouble shooting from way back in November. There's a lot for me to do, I am patient enough. The family logistics with work and school kids kinda slows me down. Am on it all.
    Thank you all for your patience.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,281

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    When I re-scan the car, should I clear the existing scan to start with a new one or "Update" (Add) to the previous (Existing) scan?


    I will go back to VIDA to look for suggestions.
    The car has a little over a quarter tank of fuel.
    After scanning you should print the summary and leave the codes to be able to easily get to the diagnostic suggestions, then after fixing (or checking suggestions) erase. Run car and do a full update to see what codes come back.

    If it were me I would put a few gallons of gas in the car and see what happens. I have seen many lying gas gauges - and many fooled techs (including myself) who spend hours going down the wrong path only to eventually diagnose a faulty gauge or broken pickup or contaminated fuel.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    401

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    After scanning you should print the summary and leave the codes to be able to easily get to the diagnostic suggestions, then after fixing (or checking suggestions) erase. Run car and do a full update to see what codes come back.

    If it were me I would put a few gallons of gas in the car and see what happens. I have seen many lying gas gauges - and many fooled techs (including myself) who spend hours going down the wrong path only to eventually diagnose a faulty gauge or broken pickup or contaminated fuel.
    I had wanted to know about the best VIDA practice. At the moment, I should use whatever code it currently has for the troubleshooting.
    If the car already has some issues, it would not be logical to erase all codes and re-scan it, since some codes would have been reported during driving. Right?

    The other VIDA question is, the DiCE tool does not have to be connected to the vehicle to trouble shoot suggestions; the codes are already embedded in to the database in VIDA. Right?

    I'll get more fuel in the tank shortly before going back to start my findings.
    Thanks for the recommendations.

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