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  1. #1

    Default Dual VVT confusion 2007 T5 turbo v70 xc AWD

    Having successfully replace the head gasket on a 2001 V70 T5 for my older daughter, I figured it was time to try the same job on the same car for my next daughter, she's 2 years behind. However, this one is a 2007. There are a few changes Volvo (ford?) made that made the job easier, but one that made it considerably harder.

    This is addition of a non spring loaded hub on the end of each cam in the 2007 rather than a single spring loaded hub on the exhaust cam of the 2001.

    It's done, but before I close it up I want to solicit your all's opinion on how the timing was set. I did what I did based on a write up If found here (http://volvospeed.com/vs_forum/topic...c90-dual-cvvt/), the salient points cut and paste below...

    ---

    'First, have the crank in the correct position with the notch in the crank gear matching the bump in the oil pump housing. .

    Exhaust cam: leave the screws that hold the gear to the VVT center loose. Push the VVT onto the cam. Install the center screw, and tighten slightly. turn the VVT unit counter-clockwise as far as it will go. Remove the center screw. Put the upper timing cover. Turn the timing gear pulley clockwise until the screws on the holes are at the limit position. Continue turning clockwise until the timing gear pulley marking is 1 gear tooth before the marking on the upper timing cover. (That means 1 tooth counter-clockwise from the marking) The timing gear pulley should still be in the limit position in the mounting holes. Tighten the center screw in the VVT unit. to 120 NM (you MUST have the cams anchored with the cam tool to do this) Check that the VVT has not rotated when tightening the center bolt. Install the center plug (65 NM). Turn the VVT unit clockwise to the limit position. turn the timing gear pulley so that the markings match the upper timing cover. tighten the bolts on the VVT unit to the exhaust cam gear. (10 NM)

    Intake Cam: same start, loose screws on the gear to VVT. press the VVT unit and gear pulley onto the cam. Install the center screw and tighten slightly. Turn the VVT unit counter-clockwise as far as it will go. Remove the center screw. position the upper timing cover. Turn the timing gear pulley clockwise until the screws at the oval mounting holes are at the limit. Continue turning clockwise until the timing gear pulley marking is 1.5 gear teeth clockwise of the marking on the timing gear cover. The VVT should still be in the limit position in the mounting holes in the gear. Tighten the center screw in the VVT unit and the cover cap (same torque). Don't let the VVT unit rotate while tightening. Turn the vVT unit clockwise to the limit position. Turn the timing gear pulley so that the marking matches the timing gear cover."

    --

    So here's how it went down, it was more of less the same on both cams. I set the crank so the marks are lined, up. I have a really cool endoscope so I have no doubt the crank is aligned correctly and I checked it periodically to make sure it didn't move. I also have the cam locker tool on the drivers side end of the cam so they weren't moving, all this was done with the valve cover installed and torqued to spec (also using the special, the two big ass wing nuts to compress it after which I installed the 24 bolts to 7 NM).

    I loosed the 3 bolts holding the hub to the gear (I never removed the hub from the cam so I ignored all the text about installing onto the cam). I move the hub as far Counter Clockwise as it would go, then I turned the gear so the bolts holding to pully to the hub were at their limit. Here's where things started to fall apart. At that point I was already (exactly) 1 tooth PAST the mark on the timing cover (on the exhaust cam, 1.5 past intake), there was no way to get it 1 tooth BEFORE at that point without turning the cam which I would not do, and couldn't do as it was locked down.

    Not sure what do to at this point I had no choice but to assume a typo. I rolled the gear back so that the timing mark on the gear and the timing cover lined up with the mark on the gear and locked down the three bolts that hold the gear to the hub. I did this on both intake and exhaust, rotated the engine by hand 2 twice (by turning the crank pully) and all stayed lined up and it moved smooth with no interference.

    I hope I did it right and that there is just a typo there. Or maybe that play is just so the computer can make minute adjustments.

    on the 2001, the spring loaded hub made sense to me, but these free floating hubs... it's like 15-20 degrees... I just don't understand the design and so I don't know if I did it right. I moved forward on the job, I reconnected the airbox to the turbo, the drivers side cam sensors, but time is running out before I have to torque down that nut on the crank and seal it up and I'd love some feedback that I did it right. Noone I know knows and I can't find a good you tube or write up besides the one I quoted.

    Thanks for your input, in advance,

    drGian
    current lineup: 2001 Volvo v70 2.4 Turbo, 2014 Ford Flex AWD, 3.5 V6 Turbo, 2017 F-150 3.5 V6 Turbo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South West Michigan
    Posts
    106

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    Quote Originally Posted by drgian View Post
    Having successfully replace the head gasket on a 2001 V70 T5 for my older daughter, I figured it was time to try the same job on the same car for my next daughter, she's 2 years behind. However, this one is a 2007. There are a few changes Volvo (ford?) made that made the job easier, but one that made it considerably harder.

    This is addition of a non spring loaded hub on the end of each cam in the 2007 rather than a single spring loaded hub on the exhaust cam of the 2001.

    It's done, but before I close it up I want to solicit your all's opinion on how the timing was set. I did what I did based on a write up If found here (http://volvospeed.com/vs_forum/topic...c90-dual-cvvt/), the salient points cut and paste below...

    ---

    'First, have the crank in the correct position with the notch in the crank gear matching the bump in the oil pump housing. .

    Exhaust cam: leave the screws that hold the gear to the VVT center loose. Push the VVT onto the cam. Install the center screw, and tighten slightly. turn the VVT unit counter-clockwise as far as it will go. Remove the center screw. Put the upper timing cover. Turn the timing gear pulley clockwise until the screws on the holes are at the limit position. Continue turning clockwise until the timing gear pulley marking is 1 gear tooth before the marking on the upper timing cover. (That means 1 tooth counter-clockwise from the marking) The timing gear pulley should still be in the limit position in the mounting holes. Tighten the center screw in the VVT unit. to 120 NM (you MUST have the cams anchored with the cam tool to do this) Check that the VVT has not rotated when tightening the center bolt. Install the center plug (65 NM). Turn the VVT unit clockwise to the limit position. turn the timing gear pulley so that the markings match the upper timing cover. tighten the bolts on the VVT unit to the exhaust cam gear. (10 NM)

    Intake Cam: same start, loose screws on the gear to VVT. press the VVT unit and gear pulley onto the cam. Install the center screw and tighten slightly. Turn the VVT unit counter-clockwise as far as it will go. Remove the center screw. position the upper timing cover. Turn the timing gear pulley clockwise until the screws at the oval mounting holes are at the limit. Continue turning clockwise until the timing gear pulley marking is 1.5 gear teeth clockwise of the marking on the timing gear cover. The VVT should still be in the limit position in the mounting holes in the gear. Tighten the center screw in the VVT unit and the cover cap (same torque). Don't let the VVT unit rotate while tightening. Turn the vVT unit clockwise to the limit position. Turn the timing gear pulley so that the marking matches the timing gear cover."

    --

    So here's how it went down, it was more of less the same on both cams. I set the crank so the marks are lined, up. I have a really cool endoscope so I have no doubt the crank is aligned correctly and I checked it periodically to make sure it didn't move. I also have the cam locker tool on the drivers side end of the cam so they weren't moving, all this was done with the valve cover installed and torqued to spec (also using the special, the two big ass wing nuts to compress it after which I installed the 24 bolts to 7 NM).

    I loosed the 3 bolts holding the hub to the gear (I never removed the hub from the cam so I ignored all the text about installing onto the cam). I move the hub as far Counter Clockwise as it would go, then I turned the gear so the bolts holding to pully to the hub were at their limit. Here's where things started to fall apart. At that point I was already (exactly) 1 tooth PAST the mark on the timing cover (on the exhaust cam, 1.5 past intake), there was no way to get it 1 tooth BEFORE at that point without turning the cam which I would not do, and couldn't do as it was locked down.

    Not sure what do to at this point I had no choice but to assume a typo. I rolled the gear back so that the timing mark on the gear and the timing cover lined up with the mark on the gear and locked down the three bolts that hold the gear to the hub. I did this on both intake and exhaust, rotated the engine by hand 2 twice (by turning the crank pully) and all stayed lined up and it moved smooth with no interference.

    I hope I did it right and that there is just a typo there. Or maybe that play is just so the computer can make minute adjustments.

    on the 2001, the spring loaded hub made sense to me, but these free floating hubs... it's like 15-20 degrees... I just don't understand the design and so I don't know if I did it right. I moved forward on the job, I reconnected the airbox to the turbo, the drivers side cam sensors, but time is running out before I have to torque down that nut on the crank and seal it up and I'd love some feedback that I did it right. Noone I know knows and I can't find a good you tube or write up besides the one I quoted.

    Thanks for your input, in advance,

    drGian
    As long as you rotated both hubs to the clockwise position where they stop at the marks on the cover and installed your belt with the crank at the same timing mark position you are good to go. It's my understanding that the three bolts are for fine adjustment. But being that you didn't remove the hubs there should have been no reason to loosen the t55 or the three fine adjustment bolts. I just replaced the exhaust vvt, cam and crank seals. Was not feeling confident, but have 500 miles and runs well.

  3. #3

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    with all three of those adjustment bolts tight I had interference with the valve cover and the end up the bolts sticking through the gear. But looking back I could have relieve that by just loosening one, or worst case 2 and freed up the valve cover and not moved them. I think I'm over thinking. I'll follow the directions I posted and go from there. I'm in the home stretch, but I had to take the timing belt off again today as the inside cover needs the pully, balancer and tensioner removed. I had forgotten about that. But that cover is back in (that's kinda a bitch), the new pully and tensioner are in, the right side hoses an sensors are all hooked up, once the timing is once again set and the various covers are all in, the serp belt in and the interjectors snapped I'm good to fire her up? I figure 10-15 more hours.
    current lineup: 2001 Volvo v70 2.4 Turbo, 2014 Ford Flex AWD, 3.5 V6 Turbo, 2017 F-150 3.5 V6 Turbo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South West Michigan
    Posts
    106

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    Quote Originally Posted by drgian View Post
    with all three of those adjustment bolts tight I had interference with the valve cover and the end up the bolts sticking through the gear. But looking back I could have relieve that by just loosening one, or worst case 2 and freed up the valve cover and not moved them. I think I'm over thinking. I'll follow the directions I posted and go from there. I'm in the home stretch, but I had to take the timing belt off again today as the inside cover needs the pully, balancer and tensioner removed. I had forgotten about that. But that cover is back in (that's kinda a bitch), the new pully and tensioner are in, the right side hoses an sensors are all hooked up, once the timing is once again set and the various covers are all in, the serp belt in and the interjectors snapped I'm good to fire her up? I figure 10-15 more hours.
    https://youtu.be/d90PynMj-BE

    This is a pretty good video of rotating the cams to their stopping point at the "clockwise" loaded position. Scroll to 5:00 to avoid the locking segment.

  5. #5

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    One point, this is a 2007 and the cam hubs don't load, there are no springs, they just float. It's weird and I have no idea how it work. They float like 15. But the directions I found (below ) say to move them counter clockwise to their limit, then move the gear clockwise until you're one (or 1.5 depending which cam) tooth before the mark, then move the gear so the mark line up and then tighten the 3 hub bolts.

    I had to loosen these 3 cam bolts because the other end of the bolts was protruding through the gear and blocking the removal of the valve cover. However, in retrospect, I should have just loosened the one that was blocking me (or worst case 2) so as not to have move the gear from where it was with respect to the VVT hub. Well, now I know for next time.

    Here's something to make you laugh. I got this all setup and put back together and realized I left the inside timing cover off. So I had to remove the belt, pully, tensioner to get it back on. I got the cover on and the pully and tensioner back on. Tonight I'll do the timing for the (God help me) last time.
    current lineup: 2001 Volvo v70 2.4 Turbo, 2014 Ford Flex AWD, 3.5 V6 Turbo, 2017 F-150 3.5 V6 Turbo

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South West Michigan
    Posts
    106

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    Quote Originally Posted by drgian View Post
    One point, this is a 2007 and the cam hubs don't load, there are no springs, they just float. It's weird and I have no idea how it work. They float like 15. But the directions I found (below ) say to move them counter clockwise to their limit, then move the gear clockwise until you're one (or 1.5 depending which cam) tooth before the mark, then move the gear so the mark line up and then tighten the 3 hub bolts.

    I had to loosen these 3 cam bolts because the other end of the bolts was protruding through the gear and blocking the removal of the valve cover. However, in retrospect, I should have just loosened the one that was blocking me (or worst case 2) so as not to have move the gear from where it was with respect to the VVT hub. Well, now I know for next time.

    Here's something to make you laugh. I got this all setup and put back together and realized I left the inside timing cover off. So I had to remove the belt, pully, tensioner to get it back on. I got the cover on and the pully and tensioner back on. Tonight I'll do the timing for the (God help me) last time.
    Ok here's the deal. Loaded means the exact position they were in when the marks lined up with the belt on. On my 2005 dual vvt, this was with the hubs stopped to the clockwise position. The play was to the counter clockwise position after the belt came off. They should be rotated to the exact same position when the belt is reinstalled. If someone has the vadis instructions rather than the ones off the other forum or my shade tree interpretation it would be helpful. However I completed the job and have over 500 miles n my 05 and no cel.

  7. #7

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    well we shall see, I followed the instructions I posted and just about wrapped it up tonight. I installed the inner timing belt cover reset the timing once again (i'm not convinces loaded is to either the CCW of CW position, if that were the case, why would volvo remove the spring loading. but resetting timing is a lot less work than pulling the head so if I get timing errors that persist I'll either deal wit them or take it in for a timing adjustment, how much could that cost?

    she almost all back to gether, just the serp belt, some coolant hoses and the bottle, the power steering bottle and various covers. I plan to start her up tomorrow, if all goes well no CEL, no leaks no issues, I'll replace the covers swap the new tires on my wreck to this car (long story) list the wreck, get her registered and hand my daughter the keys.

    this gives me a three year break before its my son's turn. He wants the flat 6 sedan, any advice there, are they are any good, will my knowledge xfer?
    current lineup: 2001 Volvo v70 2.4 Turbo, 2014 Ford Flex AWD, 3.5 V6 Turbo, 2017 F-150 3.5 V6 Turbo

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Windy Manitoba
    Posts
    628

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    flat 6 sedan? Like a Corvair 4-dr? I can help you with those.

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