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  1. #1

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    1. Do we have to purchase medical insurance while traveling in Europe? Which one did/will you use? How expensive is it for two weeks?

    2. What is the difference between the traffic laws in Europe countries and the US. Do they turn right on red?

    3. How different is the driving style there? Is it too aggressive there?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    184

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    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (stain @ May 17 2003,13:24)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">1. Do we have to purchase medical insurance while traveling in Europe? Which one did/will you use? How expensive is it for two weeks?

    2. What is the difference between the traffic laws in Europe countries and the US. Do they turn right on red?

    3. How different is the driving style there? Is it too aggressive there?[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    1. Depends upon your insurance here. &nbsp; Since all countries in W. Europe have national insurance it is best to pay upfront and present a claim to your local insurance company. &nbsp;Auto insurance is, of course, paid for by Volvo.

    2. Being conservative helps. &nbsp;You can also get a international traffic rule book from AAA.

    3. Depends. &nbsp;On German autobahns yes, other places not likely.

    Hope that helps.
    Purush
    '03 XC+DSTC+Premium+Touring+DVD Nav

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Posts
    754

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    Stain,

    I haven&#39;t driven in Scandinavia, but I currently live in Germany and have driven extensively throughout Germany, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, and Italy. I have yet to experience a &quot;right turn on red&quot; in any of those countries. I wouldn&#39;t count on having that privilege. Wish they would enact it tho&#39;&#33;

    I find European drivers, for the most part, to be much more disciplined and courteous while on the road. And yes, as Purush points out, Germans on the autobahn can be very aggressive - if you&#39;re in Germany on the autobahn use the left lane only to pass slower traffic in the right and you should have no problems.

    Also, depending on when you&#39;re coming, keep in mind that the summer months bring out lots of cyclists, both bicycle and motorcycle. Summer months here in Germany also mean lots of farm equipment (tractors, sssslllloooowwwww tractors....) is sharing the roads with the autos. It can be a bit unnerving the first time to come up on a bicycle club of 20+ cyclists making an all day road trek. Roads here are much narrower than back home in the US.

    Purush gives good advice on being conservative. You&#39;ll be in unfamiliar surroundings and the road signs will take some getting used to, so just take your time and be sensible and you&#39;ll have the experience of a lifetime. Also, keep in mind that speed limits here are posted in km, not mph - so you&#39;ll have to remember to keep an eye on the km dial on the speedometer.

    Sounds daunting, but I&#39;ve actually enjoyed my driving experience in Europe. Just use common sense, know your limits and the basic road rules of the countries you are visiting and you will have a grand time. Hope this helps....
    Cheers, Gary

    2017 XC60 T6/ Bright Silver (Mine)
    2015.5 XC70/Silver (Wife's)
    2007 XC70/Rubyred (Daughter's)
    2003 XC70/Platinum Green (Son's)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Edmonds, WA
    Posts
    3,144

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    Your Swedish Tourist Plates will also afford you some comfort as the native drivers will give you some leeway for being slow or hesitating at junctions etc. That is, they will not annoyed with you as quickly as they might otherwise. The Tourist Plates are VERY noticeable.

    Good luck and just use common sense on the roads.
    Regards -- Barry Sharp
    ==============
    Current: MY2012 XC70 T6/Twi Bronze/Espresso Brown/Polestar/Platinum/BLIS/Tech/ABL/Scuff Plates/Front&Rear cameras
    Traded 2011 C30 R-Design
    Son's '01 S60 2.3L T5,Maya Gold,96Kmi
    Son's '03 XC70 Platinum Green (OSD)
    Daughter#1 2011 XC60
    Daughter#2 2010 XC90
    SOLD '86 745 GLE 6-Cyl-Turbo Diesel,Graphite,255Kmi
    SOLD '03 XC70 to my son
    SOLD '03 XC70, '04 S60R, '07 S60R

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    No. Calif.
    Posts
    40

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    I think along with the left lane only being used to pass there are two more main things to mind. First is the use of turn signals, everyone seemed to always use them to signal their intent. Second is the car on the right has the right of way so if some ahead of you signals that they want to merge left into the lane you are in, let them in.

    Relax, there are people in a hurry, not really pushy, but they are used to being let by.

    &nbsp; &nbsp;
    Have a good time.
    &#39;04 XC70, June OSD pick up, Crystal Grn, Taupe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    945

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    At the FDC, there is a stack of booklets with road signs, swedish common roadside phrases, and driving tips.

    Pick one up along with the excellent map.

    Driving in Sweden is much more relaxed and slow paced than in Germany... or France or Italy for that matter.
    Current Volvos
    2012 XC70, OSD, Twilight Bronze/Espresso
    2008 C70, OSD, Celestial Blue/Cream Sovereign

    Former Volvos
    2009 XC70 Oyster/Black
    2006 S60R Black Sapphire/Nordkap
    2003 XC70, OSD, Ash/Espresso
    2000 S40, Ice White/Black

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    4

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    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (stain @ May 17 2003,10:24)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">1. Do we have to purchase medical insurance while traveling in Europe? Which one did/will you use? How expensive is it for two weeks?

    2. What is the difference between the traffic laws in Europe countries and the US. Do they turn right on red?

    3. How different is the driving style there? Is it too aggressive there?[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    Stain,

    ad 1.) Call your insurance and ask them if and how you&#39;re covered while in Europe.

    ad 2.) My experience is from driving in France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Czech Republic and I&#39;ve been spending a month a year driving over there for the last 10 years. I live in CA. As others mentioned: right turn on red is a no-no, always use turn signal when changing lanes, freeway left lane is only for passing. Note that they have more cops per capita than the US, i.e. better chance to get caught. ;-)

    ad 3.) In general I find driving in Europe more tiring and requiring more attentiom from the driver for several reasons. Higher speeds, narrower roads, smaller and fewer road signs. On freeways you only get one sign before an exit. If you&#39;re not familiar with the place it&#39;s easy to miss it and then the next exit is usually a lot farther than you&#39;re used to here in the US. Also I find European drivers a lot more &quot;competitive&quot; than those laid back yankees. :-)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    4

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    I forgot to mention 3 important additional differences not common in the US.

    1. The concept of the &#39;main&#39; and &#39;secondary&#39; roads. The &#39;main&#39; road is marked with a yellow square standing on its corner. Cars on it have the right of way. When a &#39;secondary&#39; road intersects with a &#39;main&#39; one there&#39;s yield sign - red triangle standing on its corner. You have to yield to all traffic on the main road and to traffic coming from the other side of the secondary road that is to your right hand side.

    2. Many intersections are of circular type and if not marked otherwise the traffic on the traffic circle has the right of way. When exiting from it you have to use the blinker.

    3. Unlike in the US you&#39;ll see a lot more of the &#39;yield&#39; signs than the &#39;stop&#39; signs. The &#39;stop&#39; really means STOP, count to three and yield to everybody.

    I hope this helps.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    262

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    Do the police enforce these rules religously there?

    Will they give you a warnign once they realize your visiting and your not 100% clear on ALL the rule differences?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    262

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    Also how srtictly do they enforce speed limits?

    I know I find my self speeding whenever I go back to Canada.

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