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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,921

    Default Few notes on brake booster replacement

    Oh man, just finished changing the brake booster. What a tough job. Here are some notes that VADIS directions won't tell you

    1. Before you disconnect battery, move the driver seat as far back as possible for the contortionist act you need to do later when removing the booster Had to connect my battery 1/2 way through the job (all kinds of electrical stuff disconnected) because I forgot this.

    2. The turbo intake hose clamp has to be loosened so the intake pipe could be rotated downwards. This is the only way to provide enough clearance to get the booster out.

    3. The 4 nuts that holds the booster is a royal pain. Make sure you have a deep metric socket (I think 13mm) a swivel, and I used 2-3 extension to get to it with some leverage on a 3/8 ratchet. Given the position you will be in down by the brake pedal area. I'd guess a left handed person would have an easier time. Your right arm/shoulder is basically laying on the carpet.

    Hissing is gone YAY! I also had intermittent shutdowns while coming to a stop. I'm guess it is related to the booster vacuum leak, we will see. I also get a fog horn type sound accelerating from a slowdown/stop sometimes. I'm hoping that is also vacuum leak related. We'll see.

    Had hissing while braking like 30k+ miles ago but I fiddled with the bellow on the booster and it went away. Hissing came back in the last few thousand miles, won't go away now and is hissing constantly even when not braking + the above shutdown + fog horn issues. Hope its all gone now
    Past Volvos : 01 V70 T5, 01/02 V70XC, 02 V70 NA, 00 V70XC
    Current EV/Hybrid : 13 Tesla S85, 11 Gen3 Prius
    Friends cars under my care 17 Audi A4 Quattro DSG (B9) 05 Audi A4 Manual 6sp Quattro (B7) 04 e320 V6 Auto, 05 Accord 2.4, 08 Element 2.4, 08 Camry Hybrid
    Past Others : 01/03 VW MK4 Turbo/NA/01M. Gen1 Prius, Gen1 CRV, Gen2 Rav4, 02 Town&Country, 06 Corolla, 12 Audi A4 Quattro (B8), 07 Civic 1.6
    http://www.freewebs.com/howardsvolvos/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Farmington Valley, CT
    Posts
    2

    Default Figured this out yet vvv I'm getting that fog horn noise and its the strangest thing.

    It's intermittent and seems to only occur when on the brakes. NO feeling or vibration. Just the tug boat / fog horn noise...

    Quote Originally Posted by howardc64 View Post
    Oh man, just finished changing the brake booster. What a tough job. Here are some notes that VADIS directions won't tell you

    1. Before you disconnect battery, move the driver seat as far back as possible for the contortionist act you need to do later when removing the booster Had to connect my battery 1/2 way through the job (all kinds of electrical stuff disconnected) because I forgot this.

    2. The turbo intake hose clamp has to be loosened so the intake pipe could be rotated downwards. This is the only way to provide enough clearance to get the booster out.

    3. The 4 nuts that holds the booster is a royal pain. Make sure you have a deep metric socket (I think 13mm) a swivel, and I used 2-3 extension to get to it with some leverage on a 3/8 ratchet. Given the position you will be in down by the brake pedal area. I'd guess a left handed person would have an easier time. Your right arm/shoulder is basically laying on the carpet.

    Hissing is gone YAY! I also had intermittent shutdowns while coming to a stop. I'm guess it is related to the booster vacuum leak, we will see. I also get a fog horn type sound accelerating from a slowdown/stop sometimes. I'm hoping that is also vacuum leak related. We'll see.

    Had hissing while braking like 30k+ miles ago but I fiddled with the bellow on the booster and it went away. Hissing came back in the last few thousand miles, won't go away now and is hissing constantly even when not braking + the above shutdown + fog horn issues. Hope its all gone now

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    4,059

    Default

    Then it's on its way out...

    I've tried the Volvo booster on the XC, it fits great and is pricey...and I've tried the ATE booster from FCP on the T5, which had DSTC, so the ATE was about $400. It bolted up OK but the pedal was a hair lower than original and the brake light switch was not making contact...so, I shimmed the brake light switch...but I think that ATE booster had a rod length difference of about 3mm....so, I would go with Volvo if I had to do it again...
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (114K, Michelin AS3+, LiquiMoly 0W40)
    2005 MB SL600 (50K, Michelin AS4, Mobil 1 0W40)
    2004 V70R (six speed M66, Mobil 1 5W30)
    2002 V70-XC (275K, HPL Euro 0W30)
    2002 V70-T5 (216K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (120K, IPD downpipe, cat back and other mods)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Farmington Valley, CT
    Posts
    2

    Default Thanks very much, we'll try the brake booster then!

    Replaced it not too long ago with a used one, probably better to go with new I guess. The only issue I'm experiencing is that strange fog horn noise when at stop lights...

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    Then it's on its way out...

    I've tried the Volvo booster on the XC, it fits great and is pricey...and I've tried the ATE booster from FCP on the T5, which had DSTC, so the ATE was about $400. It bolted up OK but the pedal was a hair lower than original and the brake light switch was not making contact...so, I shimmed the brake light switch...but I think that ATE booster had a rod length difference of about 3mm....so, I would go with Volvo if I had to do it again...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    13

    Default

    So I've had the same hissing intermittently for about 20,000 miles on my '02 (now with 155,000 miles on it). I've never had the fog horn noise, and the brakes seem to work fine. Hissing sound is intermittent as well (although becoming more frequent).

    How long can I get away without doing this job? Trying to hold onto this car as long as I can, but I've already got exhaust work to be done, and I sunk $1,800 into it earlier this year (front seals, timing chain, water pump, PCV service) - not sure I can go much longer. Is this a safety issue if it fails? Will I know when it's getting worse?

    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    arizona
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Todd's Volvo V70 2001-2008 Brake Booster Replacement Tutorial

    Just completed this job today. This is a doable operation for DIYers. Put together a tutorial. You'll need to be limber, not recommended for sufferers of osteoarthritis, spondylitis or arthraligias, or Degenerative Disc Disease or Degenerative Joint Disease. This is for healthy fit persons. That being said, proceed with caution. I purchased a brake booster on Amazon for about $150.00.

    The tools required for the procedure:
    3/8" Drive Ratchet, 1/2" Drive Ratchet, 3/8 to 1/4" adapter
    Torx set (T10)
    10mm box wrench
    7mm socket, 10mm socket, 13mm DEEP socket, 14 mm socket, 15mm socket, 17mm socket, 18mm socket,
    1/2" drive medium extension (wobbly preferred), 1/2" drive long extension, 1/4" long extension, surgical pickup or a micro flat head screwdriver;

    STEPS:

    1. Move the drivers seat to the maximum rear position (toward the rear of the car heretofore "posteriorly" ) to create maximal space for working under the dash.

    http://imgur.com/VQLAeLk

    2. Disconnect the negative terminal from the battery located). There are three 13mm bolts easily accessible with ratchet and socket. Remove plastic battery shield. Loosen 10mm bolt on negative battery terminal, remove terminal. (see other tutorial for battery installation/replacement

    3. (Under hood) Remove Engine Stabilizer Bar. There are 2 sets of 14mm bolts bilaterally (each strut tower). Remove the horizontal bolt (17mm socket) and corresponding nut (18mm socket) where the midline of the stabilizer bar (not pictured) connects to the engine mount. Note the bolt to remove is located anteriorily at the back of the engine. NOTE: Do not remove the posteriorly located midline stabilizer bar hinge that approximates the firewall.

    http://imgur.com/FJOSH9U

    http://imgur.com/UJSVLyG

    This is what the engine should look like when the bar is removed (note: the MAP sensor has been disconnected in this photo).

    http://imgur.com/f2BnmvR

    4 Locate the air intake box. Disconnect the MAP sensor (pinch until you hear a click and gently remove and set aside).

    http://imgur.com/8QMqmJV

    Remove the top of the air intake box by removing retaining clips (3) located on anterior aspect of the air box. Take note there are three tabs that inserted in the air box housing and they can be damaged if not careful, slide them forward to avoid damaging them or the housing. The top of the air box is connected to the intake pipe that aspirates the engine. It is not necessary to disconnect that tube from the top of the air box. Simply loosen the clamp (7mm bolt) and the air box top can freely rotate 360 degrees. It should be maneuvered so it is out of the way. Depending on what kind of turbo control valve you have (I have an IPD+ aftermarket valve installed) you may need to remove an additional brackets attached to the air box lid to create as much space as possible. You want to maneuver it anteromedially toward the front and midline of the vehicle and secure it with a bungie cord. NOTE: THe MAP sensor is sensitive, so exercise due caution not to be too forceful with the intake pipe.

    With the Air box lid removed, Remove the air filter element. Remove the air intake duct that inserts posteriomedially and extends anteriorly to the front grill by pulling on it with moderate force. The connector piece is square and will disconnect relatively easily with moderate force. (Not pictured)

    5. Remove the Air intake box housing. There are three insertion points that "snap" out of place with moderate force. Reach a hand down underneath the box as far as you can wedge your fingers, and pull up on the box by applying moderate pressure to remove each of 3 attachment points individually being careful not to damage electronics/sensors in the vicinity of the box. NOTE: Don't use brute force here trying to jerk the box out at once, you will likely damage something. Free each attachment one at a time with gradual force and the housing will be freed.

    http://imgur.com/FYjZbE6


    Here is a close up of the location of the attachment points for the air box housing. Again, these are pressure fitted, so no hardware removal necessary, they just "pop" out with controlled moderate gradually applied force.

    http://imgur.com/tNiMtTq


    6. Fuse Box. ** CAUTION: MAKE SURE BATTERY IS DISCONNECTED BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH THIS STEP**

    Remove the top of the fuse box by freeing the attachment clips that hold it in place and set aside.

    There are essentially two bolts that bind the fuse box to the vehicle, and one bolt that binds two of the main power leads to the fuse box. The first bolt (10mm) is located anteriorly and inferiorly (at the bottom) of the air box. Use a 10mm socket and ratchet. Easy bolt to remove.

    http://imgur.com/BhYwVxb

    The second bolt is located posteriorly and superficially (at the surface of the fuse box). NOTE: in order to access this second attachment point bolt (10 mm ratchet) you will need to remove the Red Positive Cables that are attached to the frame, thus exposing the recessed 10mm bolt.

    http://imgur.com/mslnlvU

    Use a 10mm socket (preferably with extension if necessary) to remove second 10mm bolt to the fuse box. Once the bolt is removed, the fuse box will be freed. Move the positive red cables out of the way by tucking them inferiorly and laterally. NOTE: remove the electric harness rubber grommet from the corner of the box and disconnect the harness clip from the fuse box before setting it aside. Once disconnect, move the harness and connector aside toward the engine so its out of the way.

    http://imgur.com/68BvX5m

    http://imgur.com/xS0drBO

    7. The ABS module Bracket

    The ABS module is secured to the sub frame of the vehicle by 3 small 10 mm bolts, all located inferiorly along the lower border of the bracket. Use a 10mm box wrench to remove them. NOTE: access the bolts from the front of the module toward the back. Your left arm will be able to insert underneath the module while your right arm can shimmy the module to assist in their removal. Your line of sight will be from a birds eye view of the module (on top) for the third bolt (most posterior) and left hand will access the third bolt anteriorly underneath the module. NOTE: The bolts are not high torque so one had and box part of the wrench will work. NOTE: use a smaller size (about 5-6 inch box wrench like the one photographed -- its the perfect fit for this tight space

    This photograph shows the first and second bolts on ABS bracket, the first of which has been partially unscrewed. The second bolt can be seen just posteriorly to the first, it got a little obscured by the shadow in this photograph, sorry, but it gives you the relative positioning of these hard to find bolts.

    http://imgur.com/9GUoVRd

    The second image shows the view of the third bolt on the most posterior aspect of the bracket. It is partially removed.

    http://imgur.com/TvBDofG

    Once the ABS module is freed, you'll want to direct your attention to the master cylinder.

    8. Master Cylinder Removal.

    Remove the brake fluid level sensor from the master cylinder reservoir. This is a metal spring clip, the spring is pinched and compressed and the clip slides out easily. Be gentle with this clips.

    http://imgur.com/qe2euyI

    Next, Disconnect the ABS sensor wire from the wire harness at the firewall. Move this sensor and wire out of the way.

    http://imgur.com/AfNNJA3

    Next, locate the first of 2 nuts that attach the master cylinder to the brake booster (13 mm) and remove with ratchet and socket. The nut has already been removed in this photo.

    http://imgur.com/BkP57V9

    Next, locate the second attachment nut, medially on the master cylinder and remove (13 mm) with ratchet and socket.

    http://imgur.com/FJJ6QJq

    Once the nuts have been removed, the master cylinder will be freed. Making sure the reservoir cap is air and fluid tight, move the master cylinder and ABS module anteriorly toward the front of the vehicle. You may feel the brake lines bend slightly when doing this, you want to avoid kinking the hydraulic brake lines, so whatever you do, do it slowly, methodically. You want to create enough space to remove the old brake booster.

    NOTE: Some techs advise you to remove the intake tube to create more clearance for removing the brake booster. I was able to do it relatively easy without removing that pipe. You will want to push the pipe as inferiorly (toward the floor) as possible to create max clearance. But I did not remove it from the turbo.

    9. Interior Brake Booster and Pedal

    Next, enter the interior and remove the kick plate panel from the vehicle with Torx screwdriver, i think it was T-10 or T-15. There are two torx screws securing the panel. Once removed shimmy the panel out from underneath the bordering panel toward the console. There are two tabs that insert behind the bordering panel and those should be freed next. Now with the tabs and the screws removed, the panel is held in by two spring clips (pictured next to my thumb) on either lateral end of the panel, the left of which is pictured. They "pop" out fairly easily-- apply only gentle force.

    http://imgur.com/XS3rCG7


    Next, locate the brake rod clip that attaches the brake pedal to the push rod to the master cylinder. using a needle nose pliers, gently remove the clip from the bracket and free the brake pedal.

    ** THIS IS PERHAPS THE MOST PHYSICALLY CHALLENGING STEP OF THE PROCEDURE **

    With the panel removed you'll have access to the brake booster bolts (13 mm), there are four of them that secure the booster to the firewall. You will need a full size DEEP 13 mm socket to access these bolts. The bottom two are more accessible that the top two. I was able to use an extension and a universal extension (elbow ) to get an impact tool to speed the removal of the bottom bolts. The top two I had to remove by hand with a wratchet and socket.

    10. Removal Of Brake Booster

    To generate enough clearance to easily remove the brake booster, unclip the plastic cover from the ABS engine wire harness that runs alonside the inner part of the left fender/subframe. There are several clips spaced every few inches or so, so be sure to remove them all sequentially and carefully as the plastic cover is fragile and likely brittle from engine heat. Once the cover is unclipped, manuever the very top part of it where the sensor inserted into and underneath the firewall.

    NOTE: THIS WAS A CRITICAL STEP IN ORDER TO CREATE THE CLEARANCE NECESSARY TO REMOVE THE BRAKE BOOSTER. This step prevented the need of removing the intake pipe which saves a lot of time and energy.

    http://imgur.com/AInKkIl

    Here is a close up of the harness cover maneuvered posteriorly toward the fire wall, creating necesssary clearance for the brake booster to be removed. You will note my thumb is pushing on the plastic cover in the photo. THIS WAS THE MONEY SHOT. Without this step, its nearly impossible to remove the brake booster without damaging the plastic housing or the plastic guide for the positive power cable that runs alongside it.

    http://imgur.com/7wBU5Vd

    Finally a photo of what the vehicle will look like with the brake booster removed. Note the master cylinder has been rotated anteriorly in order to create plenty of clearance.

    NOTE: There is a nice tutorial on removing the brake pedal position sensor from the old brake booster and inserting into the new one (link below). The metal "c" clip that holds it on is relatively pliable, i used a pair of surgical pick ups instead of a hook. Be gentle. It's not difficult to remove.

    http://imgur.com/RInWh42

    http://www.pelicanparts.com/techarti...eplacement.htm

    http://imgur.com/snFp6JJ

    Reassemble by reversing the order of the tear down.

    NOTE: The replacement booster rod may be of different length and require adjustment to the brake sensor switch that triggers brake lights. The brake light switch is under the kickplate in the interior of the vehicle next to the brake pedal lever. Its a small (white in my case) push button type switch that is triggered when the brake is let up. I simply disconnected the power supply from the switch (carefully) and then applied pressure to the switch and pushed the switch toward the brake pedal lever until it made maximal contact. The adjustment didn't require any hardware or tools, just a simple hand adjustment in my case, and likely yours.

    If you found this tutorial helpful, please give it a thumbs up or reference it on your volvo tech pages. Thank you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I just purchased a 2001 XC70 AWD that's in need of a brake booster. Being new to the car, I don't know if it has a stability control system, therefore I don't know which brake booster to buy. I see some brake boosters are specific to V70s with stability systems and some are for ones without. Can anyone help? Thanks!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    4,059

    Default

    Do you have a switch to turn off the stability control?

    That's part of the system.

    Your dealer could order you the part using your VIN - you would be certain that the part is correct. Not the cheapest, but you would get the right part. A friend who is a mechanic might be able to get a professional discount...you might get a discount just for asking nicely. They always give me 10% for being part of the Volvo Club, or military, whatever the mood is that day...
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (114K, Michelin AS3+, LiquiMoly 0W40)
    2005 MB SL600 (50K, Michelin AS4, Mobil 1 0W40)
    2004 V70R (six speed M66, Mobil 1 5W30)
    2002 V70-XC (275K, HPL Euro 0W30)
    2002 V70-T5 (216K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (120K, IPD downpipe, cat back and other mods)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    1,179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mattyfresh View Post
    I just purchased a 2001 XC70 AWD that's in need of a brake booster. Being new to the car, I don't know if it has a stability control system, therefore I don't know which brake booster to buy. I see some brake boosters are specific to V70s with stability systems and some are for ones without. Can anyone help? Thanks!
    How many pipes are coming out of master cylinder? DSTC has 4, no DSTC - 2.
    2002 V70 (sold)
    2005 XC70 (Telos Road took it. Did a chassis swap)
    2016 XC60

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2022
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Just completed this job for my 01 v70. Tricky, but thanks to Todd's tutorial I got out with under $200.00 for the part and about $100.00 for some extra tools. The brakes were hard and hissing but are now working perfectly. No way would I have ever been able to do it without this excellent tutorial. When I first saw what this job would entail I went to a tire shop that does brake systems and they ordered the part but then said the ABS had to have a reset code and they couldn't justify the expense, take it to a dealer or someone you trust, so I came here and did it myself. Not sure what the code issue was about unless it was related to liability.

    Thank you so much!
    Last edited by helaodinsdottir; 06-28-2022 at 09:45 PM.

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