Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: 4/5 ain't bad Volvo V70 XC shows almost 0 compression on cylinder #3

  1. #1

    Default 4/5 ain't bad Volvo V70 XC shows almost 0 compression on cylinder #3

    A few years ago, thanks almost entirely to help from this site, I was managed to replace the head gasket on a 2001 Volvo V70XC I5 turbo that I bought for $1300. I did make one mistake, which was my timing marks were hard to read; when I put it back together depending on how you looked at it the cam was hard to place within 3-4 degrees. Nevertheless, she served us well until my daughter totaled her, rear ending an F350. The car was totaled but my kid got off without a scratch. So we took the insurance money and got her a new one (not new a 2002, same car)

    Now it's time for my next daughter to get hers. I found a 2007, super clean, with 240K miles on it with a known engine problem ($1350), I assumed (hoped) it was a head gasket. I have the special tools and I've done it once so I figured I could do it again. The first car whose head gasket I did was clearly in need of one. There was oil in the coolant bottle, billows of white smoke pouring out the back that reeked of antifreeze.

    This new car (the 2007) has only 1 symptom and that is a rough idle and a less rough ride. I have codes on the OBD mostly regarding misfire of cylinder #3, occasionally #1 and occasionally about exhaust. But the CEL is always on about #3.

    I replaced the plugs and was very surprised to find the #3 plug burned down to a little nub so I replaced that and the coil pack on top of it. No different.

    Today I did the compression test and results are
    1- 150
    2- 150
    3 - 5
    4 -150
    5 -150

    So we have identified the problem. Or have we? I tried a trick I heard on car talk and dropped a little bit of lucas oil down the spark plug hold to see if that would help the compression, I have a boat engine with bad compression (not THAT bad, but bad), and this will make it go away for a few minutes or hours even

    So forgive the long preamble; I need to know how to proceed. But first some facts:

    1 - I have the wreck of the 1st XC 70 with the rebuilt engine, it's totaled, but the engine is OK. it's a great source of all kids of spare parts.. I have my $300 back already
    2 - the new car itself (2007), runs pretty much fine, it shudders a bit, but no one really minds.
    3- I have a heated pole barn, I could scare up a helper or two and have done a head gasket on this sort of engine successfully before.

    The questions are, is it the head gasket? If so, why no other symptoms? If it's rings or a scored cylinder why didn't the lucas make any difference.

    My options as I see them

    1- let my kid drive it for now, maybe she'll total it an not be injured and I can just get a new used one. Either way she just needs it from school, work, socializing and so on, we trust her any breakdown we'll come get her. I think agree no long trips

    2- tear down and replace the head gasket with the engine in the car

    3- tear down and re-ring the engine, have the cylinders reamed but I do not know if this can be done with the engine in the car *this is the big question I need help with*.

    4- swap the engine from the wrecked 2001 into the 2007, but I don't if any changes have been make in those 6 years that would prevent that working or in general how hard it. I have a 18-19 yea old help and some adjust help (former GM people)

    I'd love some advice, sympathy, help, whatever. I did buy both these cars knowing there were issues and I got them at a very good price in my market (wester MI where AWD is required) and they are very nice cars. auto climate, heated seats, crazy stereo and I've always loved the XC70. I5 Turbo with a battery in the back, how cool!

    Any advice will be welcome. Please don't waste all our time with grammar or typo corrections or to tell me I shouldn't have bought this car. If you don't understand the appeal of buying a dead car, getting it up and running and watching your kid drive off on in, I would argue that you're in the wrong forum.

    Regards

    Gian Di Loreto

    2001 XC V70 170K miles (totaled)
    2001 XC V70 240 miles (works fine)
    2007 XC V70 250 miles (blown engine)
    2014 For Flex 350 turbo (twin) V6 350 HP
    2018 Lincoln MK Z 1.4 turbo (she makes up in style and accessories what she lacks in sped)
    Last edited by drgian; 02-09-2019 at 04:51 PM. Reason: minor typos
    current lineup: 2001 Volvo v70 2.4 Turbo, 2014 Ford Flex AWD, 3.5 V6 Turbo, 2017 F-150 3.5 V6 Turbo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Might need a valve job. This sounds similar to a problem I experienced. We think that part of the spark plug may have broken off and was forced out through the valve, damaging it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrickDriver View Post
    Might need a valve job.
    Agree with this. Pull the head, get your eyes directly on that cylinder and on the head, and the issue may be clear. Good chance you'll need a top end job. I don't know what the factory spec for compression is, but if 150 is good relative to factory spec, then the bottom end is likely good so long as the piston and cylinder on #3 check out OK visually. You could get a bore scope in there to have a look first, but I think no matter what, you'll be pulling the head, so just get going on it.

    Don't drive it. Silly to drive it with a cylinder with known zero compression. 2004 and on is a slightly different engine from the previous models. I don't know anything about the compatibility, but swapping the engines is not worth dealing with in my opinion. I think there's a very good chance you'll be back on the road with a standard valve job and reassembly with a new head gasket. While you're in there, do the timing belt and water pump and the PCV system.

    Brett

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Cumbria, UK. Maine USA.
    Posts
    493

    Default

    The bore scope is a good idea before digging into to unknown, most likely it is a valve but if it is significant piston and cylinder wall damage, that would make the engine swap the best choice

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    348

    Default

    The loss of compression is going to be either:

    UPPER: head gasket leak, or poor valve closure
    or
    LOWER: leak in ring or cylinder wall.

    You could determine upper vs. lower by rotating piston 3 all the way downstoke, then pour 50 ccs of oil in thru the spark plug hole. Leave for 5 minutes. Then test oil depth with a chopstick. If the oil drained out, it's a poor ring seal.

    If it holds the oil (you'll suction it out with syringe), the ring is good, implying an upper cylinder leak. In that case, you have a strong case to pull the head.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    348

    Default

    The loss of compression is going to be either:

    UPPER: head gasket leak, or poor valve closure
    or
    LOWER: leak in ring or cylinder wall.

    You could determine upper vs. lower by rotating piston 3 all the way downstoke, then pour 50 ccs of oil in thru the spark plug hole. Leave for 5 minutes. Then test oil depth with a chopstick. If the oil drained out, it's a poor ring seal.

    If it holds the oil (you'll suction it out with syringe), the ring is good, implying an upper cylinder leak. In that case, you have a strong case to pull the head.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    348

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett San Diego View Post
    Agree with this. Pull the head, get your eyes directly on that cylinder and on the head, and the issue may be clear. Good chance you'll need a top end job. I don't know what the factory spec for compression is, but if 150 is good relative to factory spec, then the bottom end is likely good so long as the piston and cylinder on #3 check out OK visually. You could get a bore scope in there to have a look first, but I think no matter what, you'll be pulling the head, so just get going on it.

    Don't drive it. Silly to drive it with a cylinder with known zero compression. 2004 and on is a slightly different engine from the previous models. I don't know anything about the compatibility, but swapping the engines is not worth dealing with in my opinion. I think there's a very good chance you'll be back on the road with a standard valve job and reassembly with a new head gasket. While you're in there, do the timing belt and water pump and the PCV system.

    Brett
    With no compression in #3, if the leak is the exhaust valve, you would be pushing unburnt fuel thru the catalytic converter which will destroy it.
    If the leak is in the intake valve, no damage. Not sure about damage if were leaking into the crankcase...possibility of explosion that would blow all oil seals??? Agree with this post...don't drive it until you fix it.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •