Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Recommended battery requirements for xc70 Volvo?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1

    Default Recommended battery requirements for xc70 Volvo?

    Hello, I am new to the forum. I recently had my car at the shop for a repair and was told that the battery needed to be replaced. I thought this was odd because the car still "cranked." It would simply vibrate/ thump under the hood and die upon each attempt to restart. After I received a pretty hefty bill for a mere battery replacement, I experienced the same issue as I was driving a few days later: The car started to vibrate under the hood and turned itself off. I had to have it towed and it is now sitting in my driveway. When I requested my initial report, it stated that the battery at the time of replacement read 12.74V. I was told that Volvo cars are "different" and require 12.8V. (???) However, at that time, the car had the following codes: ECM-290D, 5000, 925D, and 929D. Thoughts? Suggestions? THANKS!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    403

    Default

    So it doesn't sound like the shop was able to fix your problem. Was it an indy that specializes in volvos?
    I would think a reading of 12.4+ volts on your battery would be fine. The garage's remark that volvos are "different" sounds suspicious.
    The key to solving your problem is probly in fault-tracing the codes. Go to a garage or find someone who has the VIDA/DiCE diagnostic software designed specifically to read Volvos. The software will have instructions on how to correct the codes.
    You can get more info on the codes by googling. For example, you may be having a problem with fuel delivery:
    P0087 -- ECM-290D -- Fuel pressure -- Signal too low

    Contact that garage and let them know your situation. Not sure you should trust them to do more work on your car but I bet you can make a case that they shouldn't have sold you that battery! Once you have the problem solved, tell them what was really wrong and see if you can get some $$ back.
    2007 XC70, 206,000 miles
    2002 V70XC, 130,000 miles, parts car

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    2,336

    Default

    Perhaps the shop is confused, thinking the XC70 has a gel or AGM battery?
    But since this is not the case, 12.4V is indeed good.
    However, this doesn't mean that the battery can still deliver enough current.
    144 GL (1974)--->244 GL (1982)--->940 GLE 2.3i (1992)--->XC70 2.5T (2004)--->XC90 T5 (2018)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    166

    Default

    The digital electronics require a constant voltage > 12 V. The lowest voltage output occurs during cold cranking, when the starter motor is slaving to turn the engine crankshaft.
    I've had problems in the past where, as a battery ages out, during engine start, the electronics don't start up properly.

    Fortunately, there is an easy way to determine if this is the problem. Use jumper cables from a 2nd vehicle while starting the engine. If this fixes the problem, then it's a sign that the XC70 battery wants to be replaced.

    Also, for safety reasons (to prevent hydrogen explosion in the passenger compartment), the replacement battery should be the kind with a hydrogen gas vent, and the vent should be hooked up to the vent hose as was the original battery. "Sealed" batteries are a misnomer -- they have an internal pressure relief valve what will blow if the H2 gas pressure builds up enough -- In the XC70, this volatile gas escapes into the spare tire compartment -- if ignited it could easily blow out the eardrums of everyone in the vehicle.
    That's why there's a H2 gas vent leading from the battery to the outside on these cars.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Are you getting a "check engine" warning on the console? These cars come loaded to ECM software that can help diagnose any fault serious enough to
    stall the engine. To get the specifics behind a "check engine" alert, you need to hook the car up to an ODB-II (Volvo specific) scanner or a VIDA/DICE
    computer software.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Northern Masachusettes
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Volvovere View Post
    Hello, I am new to the forum. I recently had my car at the shop for a repair and was told that the battery needed to be replaced. I thought this was odd because the car still "cranked." It would simply vibrate/ thump under the hood and die upon each attempt to restart. After I received a pretty hefty bill for a mere battery replacement, I experienced the same issue as I was driving a few days later: The car started to vibrate under the hood and turned itself off. I had to have it towed and it is now sitting in my driveway. When I requested my initial report, it stated that the battery at the time of replacement read 12.74V. I was told that Volvo cars are "different" and require 12.8V. (???) However, at that time, the car had the following codes: ECM-290D, 5000, 925D, and 929D. Thoughts? Suggestions? THANKS!

    I would say Volvos and battery's ARE different. My XC70 gets a new battery every 5 years. About 120 US. I purchase only Volvo batteries and not any dealers off or house brand, mostly cause I make sure the battery vent is blocked by a bug and I replace the battery myself. Mind the battery disconnect / reconnect procedure.

    When the voltage and battery is at the end of its useful life, it still cranks just fine. BUT if something else is wrong, more than 2 cranks, the car goes nuts. All kinds of messages, from immobilized, to clicking to, SRS warning light,...etc. It seems these Volvos are very temperamental with their low voltage. And they delight you will all kinds of strange behavior except starting.

    Of course the other issue is the El Powere Service Req., message. This can also be a faulty alternator, to the E module attached to the alternator. I have replace many Bosch voltage regulators BECAUSE OF OLD BATTERIES. Changing the module is a real PIA in the vehicle but can be done. I don't recommend it unless you have done it before.

    5 years change the battery, do not try to squeak out just some more time. After years of dealing with batteries, just change it. And don't buy into this "if it ant broke don't fix it mentality. change the battery before it takes out your alternator and or module.

    And as far as OBD codes, they are useless, the computers need 13+ volts all the time to store info. If your alternator is on the fritz , so is the car. It will run till it fails and with luck then you get the El Service message. But if you had changed the battery before it went????? Volvo electrical messages are really great at letting you know your bulbs are going, but not so good with the battery. think of it like this, have you ever seen your temp gauge go above the mid point? Volvo doesn't like to disturb the driving experience with needless distractions,....your battery going is kind of like that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    2,336

    Default

    We I bought our XC70 is 2003, I negotiated that it would be delivered with the biggest battery that would fit, a 94Ah.
    When the car was replaced after more than 14 years, this same battery was still in excellent shape.
    144 GL (1974)--->244 GL (1982)--->940 GLE 2.3i (1992)--->XC70 2.5T (2004)--->XC90 T5 (2018)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Northern Masachusettes
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    We I bought our XC70 is 2003, I negotiated that it would be delivered with the biggest battery that would fit, a 94Ah.
    When the car was replaced after more than 14 years, this same battery was still in excellent shape.
    With all due respect Willy,... 5 years. I deal with Volvos on a daily basis and the local tow company does a thriving business towing vehicles with older batteries that gave out without notice, and in each and every instance the owner is heard to say, ..."Well it started fine, yesterday."

    I write the installation date for the batteries on the Volvo cover in the wheel well in bright yellow paint marker. I'm glad you have a battery that your happy with, but for most, it's right back to that 5 year number. It is infuriating to me all those that don't have to deal with the all the no starts due to a battery and or the consequences to the electronics that could be so easily prevented. And again in each and every time, upon gathering information,...someone some where said: "Don't replace it if it ant broken." This way of thinking has caused more strife and stranding's than any other issue, IMO, than there is. It's kind of like the sealed wheel bearings,...when they go, they go without notice, and then your stuck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Recently encountered high cycle usage modern deep cycle AGM (Absorbent Glass Mat) batteries. These seems to last a long time under heavy use (lots of cycles). Here are my 2 stats

    - A little 12AH AUX battery in an 04 Mercedes E320. These were 2ndary batteries to run the brake system. Mercedes eventually got rid of these due to problems. I guess the original theory was you want good brakes even if main battery goes out. I hear these batteries gets cycled pretty often and this one lasted like 13 years.

    - A 35AH 12V battery in my Tesla that runs all electronics. Just not the big electric drive train which runs off the big expensive battery. This battery gets a serious workout, charged about 3X/day and lasted 5 years/50k miles. Was still perfectly good when replaced. Tesla's firmware just calculated that the voltage drop has increased and may not last the duration of the firmware update where this battery was the only source of power.

    My understanding is gasoline cars with an alternator supplies most of the electricity for use after start. So the battery is not really being abused much. I suppose cranking repeatedly in super cold weather might be somewhat stressful but once started, it basically gets charged up from the alternator and unused.

    So shouldn't AGM deep cycle batteries with sufficient AH rating last quite a long time in gasoline engine cars?

    BTW, seems like premium segment of all 12V battery suppliers are AGM these days.
    Past Volvos : 01 V70 T5, 01/02 V70XC, 02 V70 NA, 00 V70XC
    Past Others : 01/03 VW MK4 Turbo/NA/01M. Gen1 Prius, Gen1 CRV, Gen2 Rav4, 05 Accord, 08 Element, 02 Town&Country, 06 Corolla, 04 e320
    Current EV/Hybrid : 13 Tesla S85, 11 Gen3 Prius
    http://www.freewebs.com/howardsvolvos/

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •