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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Doesn't the Volvo shim go in the same location where the bread clip would?
    No, The Volvo shims are under the hub of the outer part of the clutch, spacing the outer clutch away from the inner clutch/pulley. I believe the bread clip/cable tie method (have never done it personally, just have seen cars where it was done and did not work) forces the outer ring of the clutch toward the inner clutch/pulley slightly by placing the clips/cable ties on the flexible straps that hold the inner hub to the outer clutch ring.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Northshore - Great Lakes
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    That is a sign the system is low on freon.

    With a low system - compressor engages, low side pressure drops, low pressure switch shuts off compressor, pressure comes back up, compressor is switched back on, and repeat. Pressures are easily checked with a gauge set. $27 and up on Amazon -

    A worn clutch causing compressor shut off usually happens after the clutch/compressor gets hot, with the failure starting first on the hottest days of the year, after driving for a period of time. And usually does not happen with such timed regularity (18sec off, 3sec on)
    The ambient is near 78F, where inside the car is warmer with windows up to help lowering the affects of seasonal allergies. The center vent air is relatively cold 52F with RECIRC, MED FAN, AC ON, and NEW CABIN FILTER. But the compressor goes ON and OFF frequently, NOT quickly. What ON and OFF cycle is time for adding R134a?
    2001 V70XC - Nautic Blue/ 2-tone Sand/ Premium/ Instant MPG 12 - 63/ Pirelli P4 12/32" - 740/ Duracell 48/ MOBIL-3309/ Pennzoil EURO 5W-40/ Zimmerman Z-coated/ Akebono/ 190K-mi/ Great Lakes

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    322

    Default AC Compressor Disc/Plate Removal

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    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/146kMiles (Brown)
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/144kMiles (Maroon)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 93K (Green)

  4. #24
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    Dec 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xheart View Post
    NOT quickly. What ON and OFF cycle is time for adding R134a?
    Normal ac operation is the low side pressure will drop when the clutch engages, if the system is low enough - the low pressure switch will turn the compressor off. The only way to tell if it is the low pressure switch causing the compressor to cycle on and off is put a set of gauges on the system, and monitor all parameters in Vida. You might just have a bad low pressure sensor. The only way to really know if the system is low is to weigh the refrigerant and there is not really an easy to do that.

    There can be other things causing the compressor to cycle - high pressure too high, (radiator fan not blowing enough/bad sensor) ac evap temp too low (bad sensor, clogged expansion tube/valve), a bad outside air temp sensor - a few of the choices.

    As far as "adding" r134 - r 134 systems are more sensitive to refrigerant levels than the r12 systems. Too much or too little r134 causes the same problem - not cold enough. Any air mistakenly injected into the system due to poor charging techniques causes performance problems also.

    What all that means is adding r134 MIGHT help bring the 52F temp down if you don't have guages/VIDA. If the system is clicking off every 3-8 seconds @2000 rpms and it's at least 80 degrees outside - More refrigerant MIGHT help (but it did leak out from somewhere!)

    To be sure - check parameters in VIDA and your gauges, then if everything looks good evacuate the system with a good vacuum pump for a minimum of 20 minutes and install the specified amount of r 134 (.9kg I think)

  5. #25
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    Mar 2013
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    guages/VIDA.
    Your write up is a good literature to keep as reference; a lot involved. Thanks for all that.

    You mentioned VIDA. I have been looking to find a location where one can really study and play with VIDA with respect to all the modules on the screen, from ECM to REM. What I mean is a kinda tutorial on each module, like ECM would be featured on what and how to use it, then the ETM, and so on. Does any such place exist?

    Currently, I am stuck in removing the disc from the compressor. Need to work on the gap, then after, the Freon system.

    Thanks a bunch.
    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/146kMiles (Brown)
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/144kMiles (Maroon)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 93K (Green)

  6. #26
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    Dec 2009
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    GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
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    I'm not sure what the second picture you posted is illustrating - other than the wrong/not easy way to get the outer part of the compressor clutch off. Maybe it is illustrating holding the compressor to tighten the center clutch bolt.

    To get your compressor clutch plate off: Take off the plastic belly pan parts in the way of the compressor from the bottom and measure the gap on the clutch plate with a feeler gauge - I think Spec is .3-.5mm. If above about .8mm you might have the heat failure disengagement problem. If gap is too large and your ac clutch stops engaging when it is hot but engages when it is cold, draw a diagram how the ACC belt is routed and take the ACC belt off, remove the 4 bolts holding the compressor to the engine and pull the compressor down and back just enough to get a 10mm socket on the front of the compressor, remove the center bolt and put a slightly longer one in just a few threads. Using parts from the tool kit in your upper picture - the round aluminum disc with the slots is attached to the front of the compressor with three appropriate bolts, (usually not the ones supplied in the puller kit) - the long bolt in the upper left corner of the tool case is then screwed into the center hole of the aluminum disc pushing against the longer center bolt you installed earlier and pulls the outer hub partially off, you may have to loosen the center bolt and make a second push to get the hub all the way off. Take the existing shims out of the center of the hub and calculate how much you will need to remove to get the gap back to ~.3-.5mm. On older cars you end up removing all of them and the gap may still be too big.

    The stolen copy of VIDA you will be using does not have a tutorial - even when it was new with a legal subscription there was no tutorial or help page. Available functions vary from year to year, model to model so you just have to plug it into a car and see what is possible. A cool thing it would do for later years (maybe 2007 and up) is a timeline, a calendar of when codes were stored.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Northshore - Great Lakes
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    In our situation, the clutch gap was taking .63mm feeler gauge, but not .60mm. So, after placing one zip tie at each of the three cultch rings, the gap narrowed to take .25mm but not .3mm.

    BUT since the R134a was way low compressor would still not kick in, the low side pressure at the manifold was close to 5psig. It took a while to suck in enough R134a at 1500rpm.

    Both RED and BLUE gauges are starting to make sense, compressor kicks in, fan comes on when condenser temp on RED gauge is close to 100F. A/C running, the RED reaches to 250psig after few compressor cycle, while BLUE will oscillate between 32 - 50psig.

    Is it true that the Volvo A/C system does not overfill?
    2001 V70XC - Nautic Blue/ 2-tone Sand/ Premium/ Instant MPG 12 - 63/ Pirelli P4 12/32" - 740/ Duracell 48/ MOBIL-3309/ Pennzoil EURO 5W-40/ Zimmerman Z-coated/ Akebono/ 190K-mi/ Great Lakes

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xheart View Post
    Is it true that the Volvo A/C system does not overfill?
    You can put too much refrigerant in any ac system I have worked on - even my home unit

    As long as the pressure in the refrigerant can is higher than the low side pressure, more will go in-

  9. #29
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    Mar 2013
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    I don't think if any of the three openings is threaded. I have the ordered shims from the dealer, removed everything up to the compressor which is tilted enough to pull the disc. It will not move. Kinda frustrated to go this far for nothing. I could have just used the bread clip or zip tie and call all a day. I have done work in cars in my life; this is one of the most frustrated ones I done. Now am angry that I would have to put all that back to end up using a clip or a tie.
    Last edited by Oka; 06-19-2019 at 01:32 AM.
    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/146kMiles (Brown)
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/144kMiles (Maroon)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 93K (Green)

  10. #30
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    GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
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    I don't think if any of the three openings is threaded. I have the ordered shims from the dealer, removed everything up to the compressor which is tilted enough to pull the disc. It will not move. Kinda frustrated to go this far for nothing.
    Here is a picture of a clutch hub with the puller attached after removal - I'm not quite sure why you are having a problem - the 3 holes on your hub look like there are threads in them, you just have to figure out what (metric) thread they are and find the correct length bolts to use with a puller. Then install a slightly longer bolt back in the center to have something to push against. You don't need new shims - you will be removing the existing shims to make the gap smaller.
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    You started this thread over a year ago - and have not described the worn clutch failure, what is the existing clutch gap?

    Your complaint is lack of cold air, you said 48 degree output on a 62 degree day. You have mentioned a cycling clutch but have never described worn clutch failure symptoms. Here in the south the symptoms are: AC stops blowing cold when very hot outside (90+) after the car has run for a while, usually first noticed on the hottest days of the year when in stop and go traffic. When checked the clutch is not engaged and there is power going to it. The clutch does not usually reengage until the engine cools down or is turned off for a while. When malfunctioning with the engine running you can usually push the clutch closed (very carefully) with a large screwdriver or pry bar to easily verify there is power going to the clutch when it is not working (repeat - very carefully you are pushing against a spinning clutch!) Then measure the gap and if too large, REMOVING shims MIGHT solve the hot clutch/too large gap clutch failure problem.

    The first photo you posted at the beginning of this thread showing low side pressure with the compressor running - looks to be about 33 PSI on the low side - that is normal if the engine is above idle speed. For r12 and r134 the low pressure almost equals the refrigerant temp. You don't want it much lower than that at higher RPMs - the refrigerant will freeze solid in the pipes if it gets too cold.

    If the system has the correct volume of refrigerant, you may simply have air in the system making the system not cool as well as it could. Air gets into the system from poor charging techniques, maybe from the DIY charging cans. Or a tech makes a mistake and forgets to bleed the air out of the hoses first.

    My suggestion once again -

    "check parameters in VIDA and your gauges, then if everything looks good evacuate the system with a good vacuum pump for a minimum of 20 minutes and using good charging techniques install the specified amount of r 134 (.9kg I think)" and see if the ac air temp is cooler.

    Also check the condenser to make sure there are still cooling fins between the pipes - I have seen several cars from northern climates that were so corroded that the condensers did not cool the refrigerant enough to produce cold air.
    Last edited by hoonk; 06-19-2019 at 02:17 PM. Reason: spelling

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