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Thread: A/C System Refill Issues

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    United States
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    216

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    I replaced my evap and vacuumed the system down, refilled with R134 and I get 38F out of the center vents when it's 100F outside.

    Maybe use a cheapo Walmart recharge and see what happens? If it leaks, then it's time to figure out what/where the problem is, fix it and vacuum/recharge.

  2. #12

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    AC is the one thing that never seemed worth the time and effort to try to do myself.
    We had an account with Tire Kingdom and they'd evac and recharge for less than $100.
    We tried the cans on several cars and it was never quite right. (especially when dealing with BMW or MB - very temperamental to AC pressures)
    One trip to the shop and done every time....

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Attachment 8622
    . . . With car stationary and running in full blast, the compressor engages and disengages
    in ten seconds intervals. When driving, it does not seem to engage and disengage.
    Isn't the ten-second intervals abnormal; the intervals are also consistent while stationary.
    Quote Originally Posted by billr99 View Post
    . . . Beauty of that is, is that the AC clutch and compressor last nearly forever.
    Bill
    Just checked the AC clutch engages about every eighteen seconds, runs for three seconds and continues with the same cycle. That that a sign of a broken clutch? I have concerns about he clutch before refilling the Freon.
    1985 BMW (E23) 735i(US)/AUTO/209K Miles
    1997 Mazda MPV/AUTO/4WD/173K Miles
    2001 Volvo XC70/AWD/Auto/Turbo/146kMiles (Brown)
    2001 Volvo V70XC/AWD/Auto/Turbo/144kMiles (Maroon)
    2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean/3.0/131K/AWD
    2006 Toyota Sienna LE/AWD 93K (Green)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    7750′47″S 16640′06″E
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    472

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Just checked the AC clutch engages about every eighteen seconds, runs for three seconds and continues with the same cycle. That that a sign of a broken clutch? I have concerns about he clutch before refilling the Freon.
    Sign of a clutch that needs to be adjusted, my 02 did that before i pulled the clutch and adjusted the clearance, they do wear and need readjusting,
    Current fleet, Countless P.O.S's, Rust buckets, Junk cars, Stolen and other assorted rubbish Volvo cars,

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    3,731

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    Ah yes, AC clutch adjustment time. Can be done with the compressor in the car.

    Cheap fix: bread clip

    Good fix: Volvo AC shim kit. Genuine Volvo PN 31332161. Cost just under $5.

    https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/vol...volvo-31332161

    Remove radiator fan, turbo crossover pipe, serpentine belt and alternator. Unbolt compressor (which is halfway undone when the alternator is out) and slide it towards the center of the car for clutch access.

    I recommend an AC clutch tool, they’re about $60 on Amazon, but you can get by with a piece of bar stock and some precisely drilled holes to hold the clutch. Edit: all you need for this job is this tool, which is $12.

    https://www.amazon.com/Powerbuilt-64...s%2C130&sr=8-4

    Measure the gap in the clutch. It should be 0.12-0.16”. If you’re having problems, it’s probably 0.3” or more.

    Remove the center 10mm bolt in the clutch while holding it with the tool. Slide the outer clutch plate off the compressor. Be very careful to get all the shims that were between the two plates. Measure the shims. Remove enough thickness in the shim stack by replacing them with the kit shims to get the shim thickness down by the amount that you want to close the gap.

    Replace the outer clutch plate with the new shims and tighten the bolt. Check your work by measuring the clutch gap.

    Put the parts all back. Done. A couple of hours and you’ve saved thousands of dollars. You’ve spent a total of $20 and done the job properly. The bread clips work for a bit, but it’s a ghetto fix. Do it right.

    I’ve got the original AC compressor and clutch in the XC. The car has over 240,000 miles on it now. AC blows ice cold.
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (100K, Michelin AS3+, M1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (238K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (195K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (76K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,186

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oka View Post
    Just checked the AC clutch engages about every eighteen seconds, runs for three seconds and continues with the same cycle. That that a sign of a broken clutch? I have concerns about he clutch before refilling the Freon.
    That is a sign the system is low on freon.

    With a low system - compressor engages, low side pressure drops, low pressure switch shuts off compressor, pressure comes back up, compressor is switched back on, and repeat. Pressures are easily checked with a gauge set. $27 and up on Amazon -

    A worn clutch causing compressor shut off usually happens after the clutch/compressor gets hot, with the failure starting first on the hottest days of the year, after driving for a period of time. And usually does not happen with such timed regularity (18sec off, 3sec on)

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    1,186

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    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    Remove radiator fan, turbo crossover pipe, serpentine belt and alternator. Unbolt compressor (which is halfway undone when the alternator is out) and slide it towards the center of the car for clutch access.
    I do that job from below - (advantage of a lift) - just remove the belt/compressor bolts and there is just enough room to move the compressor down and away from the frame rail to be able to fit the clutch puller on the front of the compressor

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    7750′47″S 16640′06″E
    Posts
    472

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoonk View Post
    I do that job from below - (advantage of a lift) - just remove the belt/compressor bolts and there is just enough room to move the compressor down and away from the frame rail to be able to fit the clutch puller on the front of the compressor
    Good method, never thought of doing it that way.
    Current fleet, Countless P.O.S's, Rust buckets, Junk cars, Stolen and other assorted rubbish Volvo cars,

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    315

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    Quote Originally Posted by Astro14 View Post
    . . . Remove radiator fan, turbo crossover pipe, serpentine belt and alternator. Unbolt compressor (which is halfway undone when the alternator is out) and slide it towards the center of the car for clutch access.
    Just curious. The 'bread clip' method, the job is done in place but with the Volvo shims, all the above removals would be done. Doesn't the Volvo shim go in the same location where the bread clip would?

    By the way, living in your geographical zone, how often do you take out the '32 Packard?
    Auto shows have already started here in Anchorage. Since our life is so seasonal, we enjoy
    the good 'ol days in the summer when the classics would come out.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    3,731

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    The bread clip is wedged in the outer part of the clutch to press it in closer. I’m not certain you need do anything other than jam the bread clip in there.

    An Internet “hack” that makes people feel clever.

    For a while.

    The shim is done on the retaining bolt.

    The shim won’t break, wear, or fall out with time. I’ve got several years on the XC shim repair. Perhaps 75,000 miles. Same on the T5. Still working perfectly.

    A proper repair.

    The Packard, thank you for asking, needs a bit of engine work. Re-Babbitt on the no. 1 rod bearing. I might convert over to regular shell bearings. All waiting on both garage space and funds. Middle child just graduated from college, oldest from medical school, last month. Youngest is in her freshman year of college.

    So, there is hope
    ...

    Cheers,
    Astro
    Current Fleet:
    2016 Tundra Crewmax 4WD 1794
    2005 MB S600 (100K, Michelin AS3+, M1 0W40)
    2002 V70-XC (238K, Castrol Edge 0W40)
    2002 V70-T5 (195K, IPD bars, Bilsteins)
    2001 V70-T5 (76K)
    1932 Packard Sedan (straight 8, dual sidemounts, original paint and interior, Shell Rotella 15W40)

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