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Thread: Ignition Coil Failure - 2009 XC70

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    NovaScotia Canada
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    10

    Default Ignition Coil Failure & Thermostat Failure Engine Overheat - 2009 XC70

    Revised - Second coil failure occurred due to heat. Thermostat failed. See end for more detail

    FYI. Recently had an ignition coil failure that cause engine to stop and car needed to be towed home. There was some indication over the previous six months of a possible problem when the engine seemed to lag/pause/miss briefly when accelerating between 2nd and 4th gears. The engine worked fine when driving 60 to 120 kph. No check engine light however when I checked codes I would sometimes get "P030600 Misfire on #6 cylinder".

    Once car towed home I checked for codes and got "P035100, P035200, P035300, P035400, P035500, P035600, Ignition Coil "A" Circuit Primary/Secondary Malfunction" and "P030600 Misfire on #6 cylinder". I looked at electrical diagram for Engine Control Module (ECM) and identified fuse 35 as providing power to the coil circuit. Checked fuse 35 and it had blown. Installed new fuse and car started but immediately stopped. Checked fuse 35 and it had blown again which meant problem was in coil circuit. I decide to disconnect plug from coil #6 which had showed code P030600. This coil is on right side of engine when looking towards car. Installed new fuse, started car and it ran on five cylinders.

    Installed new coil (part 30684245) and car is operational once again. In future if a get a Code P0301000 to P030600 I will change the coil immediately even if there are no obvious signs of misfire.

    Post repair note: Another coil failed and it is now clear that engine high temperatures caused this failure. This high temperature caused the ECM safety system to cut back coils until the engine stopped. Once stopped the high temperature residual heat cause #2 coil to also fail. Interesting the only warning I received was a graphic in the right message display of a thermometer in water and a message saying to up shift. There was no high temperature statement. Waiting for both new coil and new thermostat kit

    Car repaired now. The thermostat failed causing engine to over heat enough to fail ignition coils. One of two plastic tabs within the thermostat failed causing the thermostat and re-circulation valve to come loose. See photo for details. Took about 2 hours to take inlet manifold off, remove thermostat, and 1-1/2 hours to reinstall. Also changed alternator coupling which took 1/2 hour. Test car on 100 km trip and everything is fine. Temperature cycle from 88 C to 92 C and eventually settled at 90 C.

    In summary a coil failure combine with the information display showing a thermometer & shift up warning probably indicates a thermostat failure.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails XC70 Thermostat 1.jpg   XC70 Thermostat 2.jpg   XC70 Thermostat 3.jpg  
    Last edited by tancookbelle; 03-25-2018 at 07:17 AM. Reason: Thermostat Failure

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thermostat failed in my 2009 as well. Fortunately... when mine failed it started leaking coolant so I knew something was up. Huge hassle to change the thermostat on this car.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    California
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tancookbelle View Post
    Revised - Second coil failure occurred due to heat. Thermostat failed. See end for more detail

    FYI. Recently had an ignition coil failure that cause engine to stop and car needed to be towed home. There was some indication over the previous six months of a possible problem when the engine seemed to lag/pause/miss briefly when accelerating between 2nd and 4th gears. The engine worked fine when driving 60 to 120 kph. No check engine light however when I checked codes I would sometimes get "P030600 Misfire on #6 cylinder".

    Once car towed home I checked for codes and got "P035100, P035200, P035300, P035400, P035500, P035600, Ignition Coil "A" Circuit Primary/Secondary Malfunction" and "P030600 Misfire on #6 cylinder". I looked at electrical diagram for Engine Control Module (ECM) and identified fuse 35 as providing power to the coil circuit. Checked fuse 35 and it had blown. Installed new fuse and car started but immediately stopped. Checked fuse 35 and it had blown again which meant problem was in coil circuit. I decide to disconnect plug from coil #6 which had showed code P030600. This coil is on right side of engine when looking towards car. Installed new fuse, started car and it ran on five cylinders.

    Installed new coil (part 30684245) and car is operational once again. In future if a get a Code P0301000 to P030600 I will change the coil immediately even if there are no obvious signs of misfire.

    Post repair note: Another coil failed and it is now clear that engine high temperatures caused this failure. This high temperature caused the ECM safety system to cut back coils until the engine stopped. Once stopped the high temperature residual heat cause #2 coil to also fail. Interesting the only warning I received was a graphic in the right message display of a thermometer in water and a message saying to up shift. There was no high temperature statement. Waiting for both new coil and new thermostat kit

    Car repaired now. The thermostat failed causing engine to over heat enough to fail ignition coils. One of two plastic tabs within the thermostat failed causing the thermostat and re-circulation valve to come loose. See photo for details. Took about 2 hours to take inlet manifold off, remove thermostat, and 1-1/2 hours to reinstall. Also changed alternator coupling which took 1/2 hour. Test car on 100 km trip and everything is fine. Temperature cycle from 88 C to 92 C and eventually settled at 90 C.

    In summary a coil failure combine with the information display showing a thermometer & shift up warning probably indicates a thermostat failure.
    Thank you for posting this information.

    I have a 2008 LR2 with the Volvo 3.2

    I decided to replace the thermostat at 10 years based on your post

    About 5 minutes after removing the thermostat it failed in the same way that yours did

    Thanks so much for sharing

    Paul

    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    California
    Posts
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    I posted some additional pictures on the Land Rover board

    If you are looking for more information about changing the thermostat then take a look

    http://www.freel2.com/forum/topic32245.html

    One last thought

    Please post here if youíve replaced (or had someone do it for you) the Thermostat or the coolant hose for the heat exchanger.

    In fact even if you havenít had it done that would be nice to know as well.

    Take care

    We B6324S owners need to stick together

    Thanks.

    Paul

    PS the B6324S is the code for the naturally aspirated 3.2 liter 6 cylinder in your Volvo (and my Land Rover)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    California
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    All,

    I just replaced my Thermostat on my 2010 S80 3.2 125,000 miles

    This is the same Thermostat used in 3.2 and 3.0T XC70, XC90, XC60, S60, SS80, V70 and Land Rover LR2

    Note the Thermostat was only 8 years old but it has more miles than my 2008 LR2 (see above)

    I don't think that the failure is related to miles but it is probably related to operating hours.


    Picture of what I found

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Note: I didn't have any symptoms, I replace the Thermostat as a preventative maintenance



    Tancookbelle thanks again

    Paul

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Pleasanton CA USA
    Posts
    348

    Default

    I don't expect Volvo engineers to scour pages for a car they have dropped, but it needs stating that the temperature gauge was considered informative
    for to drivers for 90 years. Why was it eliminated? I get the sense that a gauge on the console would have made a difference in this case. Using the magic of software, it could be a gauge that pops up situationally when there is the slightest overheating, and hides under normal conditions. Why should you need to hook up a specialized analyzer to read out an analog value?

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